intro and a question

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
4 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

intro and a question

Alex Hall-2
Hello all,
My name is Alex Hall.  I am legally blind; blind enough to need
JAWS and a Braillenote to work on a computer.  I am working with
Firefox for the first time, and am trying to write an extension
for it.  I think my code will work, but I cannot figure out two
things:
1.  What should be in the chrome.manifest and install.rdf files?
2.  How can I "compile" my extension so I can install it and
start debugging and adding/testing features?
Thanks for any help.

Have a great day,
Alex
_______________________________________________
dev-accessibility mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: intro and a question

Ken Saunders-2
Hi Alex,
I'm not a developer I'm a contributor to a few add-ons so I can at
least point you in the right direction until you get a specific reply
from someone here.
The first link is to the extensions page on the Mozilla Developer
Center site. You'll more than likely find all of the answers (and then
some) to your questions about Mozilla extensions there.
http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Extensions
Next is the Extension Development forum on mozillaZine.org where you
can interact with other developers and get some help and guidance.
http://forums.mozillazine.org/viewforum.php?f=19
Finally, the little that I know about extensions and themes I learned
from simply exploring the add-on's source files.
Extensions are just about always .XPI files and themes are
usually .JAR files. Go to the Mozilla add-ons site and choose an add-
on that you'd like to explore (perhaps one that may be related to what
you are working on).
Instead of clicking on the Install button, right click on the install
button and select Save Link As and save that to whatever location that
you want.
To explore the files that make up the add-on, I use 7 Zip.
http://www.7-zip.org/
It's a free and open source Windows utility for manipulating archives.
I'm sure that others will work, but that is what I've always used.
Once installed, right click on the add-on file that you saved and
select Open archive. This will allow you to see all of the components
that make up an add-on. Sometimes you'll need to drag a file or folder
within an add-on to your desktop to explore it. For example, the
install.rdf is usually one of the first files that you'll see when you
open an add-on. You'll need to drag it to your desktop in order to
make changes to it or to simply browse through it. A good amount of
the files in an add-on can be viewed and edited with a simple text
editor application. I use EditPad Lite (free).
Right click on a file that has been dragged to your desktop and select
Edit, or Open With and select the program that you wish to use.
You can associate EditPad Lite with many different file types and have
EditPad Lite open them by default.
Good luck and please feel free to contact me when you are ready for
someone to kick the tires on your extension. :)
Ken

P.S.
Another helpful tool
Extension Developer (Firefox Add-on)
https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/7434








On Jul 10, 6:46 pm, Alex Hall <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hello all,
> My name is Alex Hall.  I am legally blind; blind enough to need
> JAWS and a Braillenote to work on a computer.  I am working with
> Firefox for the first time, and am trying to write an extension
> for it.  I think my code will work, but I cannot figure out two
> things:
> 1.  What should be in the chrome.manifest and install.rdf files?
> 2.  How can I "compile" my extension so I can install it and
> start debugging and adding/testing features?
> Thanks for any help.
>
> Have a great day,
> Alex

_______________________________________________
dev-accessibility mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: intro and a question

Alex Hall-2
In reply to this post by Alex Hall-2
Thanks for the links, they should help.

Have a great day,
Alex

> ----- Original Message -----
>From: Ken Saunders <[hidden email]
>To: [hidden email]
>Date sent: Thu, 10 Jul 2008 17:50:25 -0700 (PDT)
>Subject: Re: intro and a question

>Hi Alex,
>I'm not a developer I'm a contributor to a few add-ons so I can
at
>least point you in the right direction until you get a specific
reply
>from someone here.
>The first link is to the extensions page on the Mozilla Developer
>Center site.  You'll more than likely find all of the answers
(and then
>some) to your questions about Mozilla extensions there.
>http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Extensions
>Next is the Extension Development forum on mozillaZine.org where
you
>can interact with other developers and get some help and
guidance.
>http://forums.mozillazine.org/viewforum.php?f=19
>Finally, the little that I know about extensions and themes I
learned
>from simply exploring the add-on's source files.
>Extensions are just about always .XPI files and themes are
>usually .JAR files.  Go to the Mozilla add-ons site and choose an
add-
>on that you'd like to explore (perhaps one that may be related to
what
>you are working on).
>Instead of clicking on the Install button, right click on the
install
>button and select Save Link As and save that to whatever location
that
>you want.
>To explore the files that make up the add-on, I use 7 Zip.
>http://www.7-zip.org/
>It's a free and open source Windows utility for manipulating
archives.
>I'm sure that others will work, but that is what I've always
used.
>Once installed, right click on the add-on file that you saved and
>select Open archive.  This will allow you to see all of the
components
>that make up an add-on.  Sometimes you'll need to drag a file or
folder
>within an add-on to your desktop to explore it.  For example, the
>install.rdf is usually one of the first files that you'll see
when you
>open an add-on.  You'll need to drag it to your desktop in order
to
>make changes to it or to simply browse through it.  A good amount
of
>the files in an add-on can be viewed and edited with a simple
text
>editor application.  I use EditPad Lite (free).
>Right click on a file that has been dragged to your desktop and
select
>Edit, or Open With and select the program that you wish to use.
>You can associate EditPad Lite with many different file types and
have
>EditPad Lite open them by default.
>Good luck and please feel free to contact me when you are ready
for
>someone to kick the tires on your extension.  :)
>Ken

>P.S.
>Another helpful tool
>Extension Developer (Firefox Add-on)
>https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/7434








>On Jul 10, 6:46 pm, Alex Hall <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Hello all,
>> My name is Alex Hall.   I am legally blind; blind enough to need
>> JAWS and a Braillenote to work on a computer.   I am working
with
>> Firefox for the first time, and am trying to write an extension
>> for it.   I think my code will work, but I cannot figure out two
>> things:
>> 1.   What should be in the chrome.manifest and install.rdf
files?
>> 2.   How can I "compile" my extension so I can install it and
>> start debugging and adding/testing features?
>> Thanks for any help.

>> Have a great day,
>> Alex

>_______________________________________________
>dev-accessibility mailing list
>[hidden email]
>https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility


_______________________________________________
dev-accessibility mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: intro and a question

mozilla accessibility
In reply to this post by Alex Hall-2
Alex, check out these documents:
http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Setting_up_extension_development_environment
http://kb.mozillazine.org/Getting_started_with_extension_development#chrome.manifest


You don't need to compile anything. Your code is javascript and xml which
are both interpreted by the browser. The javascript may or may not be
compiled automagically for you when it is loaded, but there is no explicit
compilation step.  If you wish, you can package your extension in .jar
files, but this is not strictly necessary either.

If you have specific questions, or want an example of install.rdf or
chrome.manifest, lest me know.

-- Rich


----- Original Message -----
From: "Alex Hall" <[hidden email]>
To: <[hidden email]>
Sent: Thursday, July 10, 2008 6:46 PM
Subject: intro and a question


Hello all,
My name is Alex Hall.  I am legally blind; blind enough to need
JAWS and a Braillenote to work on a computer.  I am working with
Firefox for the first time, and am trying to write an extension
for it.  I think my code will work, but I cannot figure out two
things:
1.  What should be in the chrome.manifest and install.rdf files?
2.  How can I "compile" my extension so I can install it and
start debugging and adding/testing features?
Thanks for any help.

Have a great day,
Alex
_______________________________________________
dev-accessibility mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility

_______________________________________________
dev-accessibility mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility