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Re: coffee

Ron Hunter
On 11/20/2013 2:39 PM, Mike Easter wrote:

> Ron Hunter wrote:
>> Mike Easter wrote:
>
>>> Astronauts can choose from ordinary coffee (leaded or unleaded) and Kona
>>> coffee. It comes black, with artificial sweetener, with cream(er), with
>>> both, with sugar, or with cream(er) and sugar. And it all tastes bad.
>
>> For some of us ALL coffee tastes terrible.  'Bad' doesn't come close.
>
> I was surprised by the stat that tea drinking exceeds coffee.
>
> I think some of those stats must go 'up and down'.  Surely the Starbucks
> expansion craze and all of its siblings which evolved must've had an
> impact on some stats.  And then of course Starbucks bought Teavana and
> also started opening coffee places in countries like Japan.
>
> Personally I almost never go out to buy prepared coffee unless it is
> 'unavoidable'.
>
> When I go on a trip I 'pre-grind' some beans and take along the 'bean
> powder' and some filters in anticipation of finding something to brew my
> own coffee so that I don't have to go out and find some.
>
>
>
I believe that was in the UK?  Or did I misinterpret it?

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Re: coffee

Mike Easter-2
Ron Hunter wrote:
> Mike Easter wrote:

>> I was surprised by the stat that tea drinking exceeds coffee.

> I believe that was in the UK?  Or did I misinterpret it?

I cited a .uk domain page about instant coffee consumuption, but the
stats on the page were 'generic' not .uk.

That page says: Coffee is the most popular drink worldwide with over 400
billion cups consumed each year.



I don't recall where I saw the stat that (worldwide) coffee consumption
was second to tea, but it would seem to me that worldwide there are a
lot of very densely populated places where tea consumption is greater
than coffee.


--
Mike Easter
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Re: coffee

James Silverton-3
On 11/20/2013 5:28 PM, Mike Easter wrote:

> Ron Hunter wrote:
>> Mike Easter wrote:
>
>>> I was surprised by the stat that tea drinking exceeds coffee.
>
>> I believe that was in the UK?  Or did I misinterpret it?
>
> I cited a .uk domain page about instant coffee consumuption, but the
> stats on the page were 'generic' not .uk.
>
> That page says: Coffee is the most popular drink worldwide with over 400
> billion cups consumed each year.
>
>
>
> I don't recall where I saw the stat that (worldwide) coffee consumption
> was second to tea, but it would seem to me that worldwide there are a
> lot of very densely populated places where tea consumption is greater
> than coffee.
>
>
Japan and Britain perhaps but not the US or Scandinavia or France or
Germany I would guess. It's a bit strange if GB has gone back to tea. As
a student, I always drank coffee for a non-alcoholic drink. When I was a
graduate student, the nearest place for a break was a coffee shop called
"The Papingo".

--

James Silverton ( NOT not.jim.silverton)
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Re: coffee

Ron Hunter
In reply to this post by Mike Easter-2
On 11/20/2013 4:28 PM, Mike Easter wrote:

> Ron Hunter wrote:
>> Mike Easter wrote:
>
>>> I was surprised by the stat that tea drinking exceeds coffee.
>
>> I believe that was in the UK?  Or did I misinterpret it?
>
> I cited a .uk domain page about instant coffee consumuption, but the
> stats on the page were 'generic' not .uk.
>
> That page says: Coffee is the most popular drink worldwide with over 400
> billion cups consumed each year.
>
>
>
> I don't recall where I saw the stat that (worldwide) coffee consumption
> was second to tea, but it would seem to me that worldwide there are a
> lot of very densely populated places where tea consumption is greater
> than coffee.
>
>
In Asia, I am sure.

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Re: coffee

PhillipJones-2
In reply to this post by Sailfish-4
Sailfish wrote:

> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>> rebro wrote:
>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>
>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>> here).
>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>> (granny Harris).
>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>
>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>
>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>
>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>> first made long before the war.
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>
>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>
> Wow'sa!
>
Maybe  it was an additive during WWII But H&C, Louisanne, & JFG are
still sold in South in the USA and they still have Chicory as an
ingredient. This is even after 60 years. Since I learned at an early age
to drink Strong Coffee I was able to drink most even terrible Coffee be
okay with it.

--
Phillip M. Jones, C.E.T.      "If it's Fixed, Don't Break it"
http://www.phillipmjones.net    mailto:[hidden email]
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Re: coffee

Sailfish-4
My bloviated meandering follows what PhillipJones graced us with on
11/20/2013 6:35 PM:

> Sailfish wrote:
>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>> here).
>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>
>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>
>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>
>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>> first made long before the war.
>>>
>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>
>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>
>> Wow'sa!
>>
> Maybe  it was an additive during WWII But H&C, Louisanne, & JFG are
> still sold in South in the USA and they still have Chicory as an
> ingredient. This is even after 60 years. Since I learned at an early age
> to drink Strong Coffee I was able to drink most even terrible Coffee be
> okay with it.
>
I drank coffee that tasted like burnt motor oil at times but I was NEVER
okay with it :_)

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/lcey2ex
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Re: coffee

PhillipJones-2
Sailfish wrote:

> My bloviated meandering follows what PhillipJones graced us with on
> 11/20/2013 6:35 PM:
>> Sailfish wrote:
>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>>
>>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>>
>>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>>
>>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>>> first made long before the war.
>>>>
>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>>
>>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>>
>>> Wow'sa!
>>>
>> Maybe  it was an additive during WWII But H&C, Louisanne, & JFG are
>> still sold in South in the USA and they still have Chicory as an
>> ingredient. This is even after 60 years. Since I learned at an early
>> age to drink Strong Coffee I was able to drink most even terrible
>> Coffee be okay with it.
>>
> I drank coffee that tasted like burnt motor oil at times but I was NEVER
> okay with it :_)
>
well when you grew drinking Coffee with Chicory. And thing else tasted
Mild by comparison. :-)

--
Phillip M. Jones, C.E.T.      "If it's Fixed, Don't Break it"
http://www.phillipmjones.net    mailto:[hidden email]
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Re: coffee

Ron Hunter
In reply to this post by PhillipJones-2
On 11/20/2013 8:35 PM, PhillipJones wrote:

> Sailfish wrote:
>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>> here).
>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>
>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>
>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>
>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>> first made long before the war.
>>>
>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>
>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>
>> Wow'sa!
>>
> Maybe  it was an additive during WWII But H&C, Louisanne, & JFG are
> still sold in South in the USA and they still have Chicory as an
> ingredient. This is even after 60 years. Since I learned at an early age
> to drink Strong Coffee I was able to drink most even terrible Coffee be
> okay with it.
>
Very often things that seem like deprivations during a war become
'comfort food' afterwards.  A couple of examples from each side of the
pond are 'bangers and mash', and Spam.  Spam in the most popular product
line of Hormel, especially in Hawaii, where they sell 1100 varieties!
Amazing!

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Re: coffee

Bob Henson-4


On 21/11/2013 8:20 AM, Ron Hunter wrote:

> On 11/20/2013 8:35 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>> Sailfish wrote:
>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>>
>>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>>
>>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>>
>>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>>> first made long before the war.
>>>>
>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>>
>>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>>
>>> Wow'sa!
>>>
>> Maybe  it was an additive during WWII But H&C, Louisanne, & JFG are
>> still sold in South in the USA and they still have Chicory as an
>> ingredient. This is even after 60 years. Since I learned at an early age
>> to drink Strong Coffee I was able to drink most even terrible Coffee be
>> okay with it.
>>
> Very often things that seem like deprivations during a war become
> 'comfort food' afterwards.  A couple of examples from each side of the
> pond are 'bangers and mash', and Spam.  Spam in the most popular product
> line of Hormel, especially in Hawaii, where they sell 1100 varieties!
> Amazing!
>

I'm not sure I should admit this publicly, but I have to say I love
fried Spam - or better still Spam fritters. Actually, "loved" is more
accurate - these days my cardiologist would have a heart attack if I was
seen eating it. Maybe that's why I needed a cardiologist :-)

Cardiologist's diet - If it tastes good, spit it out!

--
Bob - Tetbury, Gloucestershire, UK

Capitalism - the survival of the fattest.
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Re: coffee

Ron Hunter
On 11/21/2013 3:51 AM, Bob Henson wrote:

>
>
> On 21/11/2013 8:20 AM, Ron Hunter wrote:
>> On 11/20/2013 8:35 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>> Sailfish wrote:
>>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>>>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>>>
>>>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>>>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>>>> first made long before the war.
>>>>>
>>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>>>
>>>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>>>
>>>> Wow'sa!
>>>>
>>> Maybe  it was an additive during WWII But H&C, Louisanne, & JFG are
>>> still sold in South in the USA and they still have Chicory as an
>>> ingredient. This is even after 60 years. Since I learned at an early age
>>> to drink Strong Coffee I was able to drink most even terrible Coffee be
>>> okay with it.
>>>
>> Very often things that seem like deprivations during a war become
>> 'comfort food' afterwards.  A couple of examples from each side of the
>> pond are 'bangers and mash', and Spam.  Spam in the most popular product
>> line of Hormel, especially in Hawaii, where they sell 1100 varieties!
>> Amazing!
>>
>
> I'm not sure I should admit this publicly, but I have to say I love
> fried Spam - or better still Spam fritters. Actually, "loved" is more
> accurate - these days my cardiologist would have a heart attack if I was
> seen eating it. Maybe that's why I needed a cardiologist :-)
>
> Cardiologist's diet - If it tastes good, spit it out!
>
Bob,
I have eaten Spam for as long as I can recall, because it used to be
cheap, and we were poor.  It is 'comfort food' for me, and I eat it
several times a week, in moderation.  I have a couple of good recipes I
like, using it, and my wife also enjoys it.  I consider a few cans of
Spam 'standard' items for my pantry.  Never been to a cardiologist, but
my doctor never seems to have any comment when he checks my heart, or
lungs, or carotid artery, so I guess I am ok for being 71 next month.

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Re: coffee

Bob Henson-4


On 21/11/2013 11:08 AM, Ron Hunter wrote:

> On 11/21/2013 3:51 AM, Bob Henson wrote:
>>
>>
>> On 21/11/2013 8:20 AM, Ron Hunter wrote:
>>> On 11/20/2013 8:35 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>> Sailfish wrote:
>>>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>>>>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>>>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>>>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>>>>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>>>>> first made long before the war.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>>>>
>>>>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>>>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>>>>
>>>>> Wow'sa!
>>>>>
>>>> Maybe  it was an additive during WWII But H&C, Louisanne, & JFG are
>>>> still sold in South in the USA and they still have Chicory as an
>>>> ingredient. This is even after 60 years. Since I learned at an early age
>>>> to drink Strong Coffee I was able to drink most even terrible Coffee be
>>>> okay with it.
>>>>
>>> Very often things that seem like deprivations during a war become
>>> 'comfort food' afterwards.  A couple of examples from each side of the
>>> pond are 'bangers and mash', and Spam.  Spam in the most popular product
>>> line of Hormel, especially in Hawaii, where they sell 1100 varieties!
>>> Amazing!
>>>
>>
>> I'm not sure I should admit this publicly, but I have to say I love
>> fried Spam - or better still Spam fritters. Actually, "loved" is more
>> accurate - these days my cardiologist would have a heart attack if I was
>> seen eating it. Maybe that's why I needed a cardiologist :-)
>>
>> Cardiologist's diet - If it tastes good, spit it out!
>>
> Bob,
> I have eaten Spam for as long as I can recall, because it used to be
> cheap, and we were poor.  It is 'comfort food' for me, and I eat it
> several times a week, in moderation.  I have a couple of good recipes I
> like, using it, and my wife also enjoys it.  I consider a few cans of
> Spam 'standard' items for my pantry.  Never been to a cardiologist, but
> my doctor never seems to have any comment when he checks my heart, or
> lungs, or carotid artery, so I guess I am ok for being 71 next month.
>

I clock up 70 next month - so you're winning :-) You're also a better
bet than me, I had a heart attack last year - hence the ban on too many
fatty foods. Since "She Who Must Be Obeyed" still works, I'm chef these
days - so I have no excuses whatsoever if the diet is bad!

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Re: coffee

Trane Francks
In reply to this post by Bob Henson-4
On 11/20/13 3:26 AM +0900, Bob Henson wrote:

>
>
> On 19/11/2013 4:16 PM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>> On 19/11/2013 16:13, rebro wrote:
>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>
>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>> here).
>>>
>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>> real coffee. :-)
>>
>>
>> Most people who drink coffee at home drink instant, so not really.
>>
>
> This one has a Gaggia espresso machine, and avoids instant coffee
> whenever possible.
>
It's ALWAYS possible to avoid instant coffee. I'd rather go without. I
haven't had a cup of instant in probably 30 or more years. It's just crap.

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Re: coffee

Trane Francks
In reply to this post by Bob Henson-4
On 11/20/13 5:53 PM +0900, Bob Henson wrote:

>
>
> On 20/11/2013 7:44 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>> On 19/11/2013 20:42, James Silverton wrote:
>>> On 11/19/2013 11:16 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>>>> On 19/11/2013 16:13, rebro wrote:
>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>> here).
>>>>>
>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Most people who drink coffee at home drink instant, so not really.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Can you quote any reference for that statement about "most people"? I
>>> have some instant in the freezer but I only drink it when real coffee is
>>> not available.
>>>
>> I seem to have trodden on some corns here.  I understood the original
>> comment to be about the UK.  Apart from a few enthusiasts, we do not
>> know as much about coffee as Americans.
>
> You must be joking. Have you tried the dirty hot water that Starbucks
> serve instead of coffee?
>
I'm happy that Starbucks manages to brew a decent pot of coffee here in
Japan. I can't speak for other countries, mind.

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Re: coffee

Trane Francks
In reply to this post by Mike Easter-2
On 11/21/13 5:39 AM +0900, Mike Easter wrote:

> Ron Hunter wrote:
>> Mike Easter wrote:
>
>>> Astronauts can choose from ordinary coffee (leaded or unleaded) and Kona
>>> coffee. It comes black, with artificial sweetener, with cream(er), with
>>> both, with sugar, or with cream(er) and sugar. And it all tastes bad.
>
>> For some of us ALL coffee tastes terrible.  'Bad' doesn't come close.
>
> I was surprised by the stat that tea drinking exceeds coffee.
>
> I think some of those stats must go 'up and down'.  Surely the Starbucks
> expansion craze and all of its siblings which evolved must've had an
> impact on some stats.  And then of course Starbucks bought Teavana and
> also started opening coffee places in countries like Japan.

Amazingly, the coffee places in Japan that Starbucks opened are called
'Starbucks'. Quite a mind-bender, that.

> Personally I almost never go out to buy prepared coffee unless it is
> 'unavoidable'.

It's always avoidable. If you can't have a proper cup of coffee, have
tea or water. (At least, that's how I handle it.)

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Re: coffee

Trane Francks
In reply to this post by Ron Hunter
On 11/21/13 5:20 PM +0900, Ron Hunter wrote:

> On 11/20/2013 8:35 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>> Sailfish wrote:
>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>>
>>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>>
>>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>>
>>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>>> first made long before the war.
>>>>
>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>>
>>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>>
>>> Wow'sa!
>>>
>> Maybe  it was an additive during WWII But H&C, Louisanne, & JFG are
>> still sold in South in the USA and they still have Chicory as an
>> ingredient. This is even after 60 years. Since I learned at an early age
>> to drink Strong Coffee I was able to drink most even terrible Coffee be
>> okay with it.
>>
> Very often things that seem like deprivations during a war become
> 'comfort food' afterwards.  A couple of examples from each side of the
> pond are 'bangers and mash', and Spam.  Spam in the most popular product
> line of Hormel, especially in Hawaii, where they sell 1100 varieties!
> Amazing!
>
Ron, I think you're going to have to come up with a link for 1100
varieties. Hormel lists 21. I have a VERY hard time believing the
veracity of your claim.

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Re: coffee

Jay Garcia
In reply to this post by Trane Francks
On 21.11.2013 06:01, Trane Francks wrote:

 --- Original Message ---

> On 11/20/13 5:53 PM +0900, Bob Henson wrote:
>>
>>
>> On 20/11/2013 7:44 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>>> On 19/11/2013 20:42, James Silverton wrote:
>>>> On 11/19/2013 11:16 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>>>>> On 19/11/2013 16:13, rebro wrote:
>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Most people who drink coffee at home drink instant, so not really.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Can you quote any reference for that statement about "most people"? I
>>>> have some instant in the freezer but I only drink it when real
>>>> coffee is
>>>> not available.
>>>>
>>> I seem to have trodden on some corns here.  I understood the original
>>> comment to be about the UK.  Apart from a few enthusiasts, we do not
>>> know as much about coffee as Americans.
>>
>> You must be joking. Have you tried the dirty hot water that Starbucks
>> serve instead of coffee?
>>
> I'm happy that Starbucks manages to brew a decent pot of coffee here in
> Japan. I can't speak for other countries, mind.
>

Starbucks here is considered "show off" coffee. Hey looka me, I can
afford Starbucks!! woo hooooo .. NOT!!

The best coffee here is what is known as coffee extract - made by
soaking a pound of coffee and chicory grounds in 2 qts water over night
and in the morning, filter into your container which is kept in the
fridge. Then, to make a cup, use 1 to 1-1/2 oz extract in a cup with hot
milk. This is true N'Awlins style cafe au lait

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Re: coffee

Jay Garcia
In reply to this post by Trane Francks
On 21.11.2013 06:10, Trane Francks wrote:

 --- Original Message ---

> On 11/21/13 5:20 PM +0900, Ron Hunter wrote:
>> On 11/20/2013 8:35 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>> Sailfish wrote:
>>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>>>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in
>>>>>>>> reference to
>>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>>>
>>>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a
>>>>> thing in
>>>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>>>> first made long before the war.
>>>>>
>>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>>>
>>>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>>>
>>>> Wow'sa!
>>>>
>>> Maybe  it was an additive during WWII But H&C, Louisanne, & JFG are
>>> still sold in South in the USA and they still have Chicory as an
>>> ingredient. This is even after 60 years. Since I learned at an early age
>>> to drink Strong Coffee I was able to drink most even terrible Coffee be
>>> okay with it.
>>>
>> Very often things that seem like deprivations during a war become
>> 'comfort food' afterwards.  A couple of examples from each side of the
>> pond are 'bangers and mash', and Spam.  Spam in the most popular product
>> line of Hormel, especially in Hawaii, where they sell 1100 varieties!
>> Amazing!
>>
> Ron, I think you're going to have to come up with a link for 1100
> varieties. Hormel lists 21. I have a VERY hard time believing the
> veracity of your claim.
>

Maybe he means 1100 ways to cook it .. dunno.

http://www.spam.com/varieties


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Re: coffee

James Silverton-3
In reply to this post by Jay Garcia
On 11/21/2013 8:30 AM, Jay Garcia wrote:

> On 21.11.2013 06:01, Trane Francks wrote:
>
>   --- Original Message ---
>
>> On 11/20/13 5:53 PM +0900, Bob Henson wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> On 20/11/2013 7:44 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>>>> On 19/11/2013 20:42, James Silverton wrote:
>>>>> On 11/19/2013 11:16 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>>>>>> On 19/11/2013 16:13, rebro wrote:
>>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Most people who drink coffee at home drink instant, so not really.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Can you quote any reference for that statement about "most people"? I
>>>>> have some instant in the freezer but I only drink it when real
>>>>> coffee is
>>>>> not available.
>>>>>
>>>> I seem to have trodden on some corns here.  I understood the original
>>>> comment to be about the UK.  Apart from a few enthusiasts, we do not
>>>> know as much about coffee as Americans.
>>>
>>> You must be joking. Have you tried the dirty hot water that Starbucks
>>> serve instead of coffee?
>>>
>> I'm happy that Starbucks manages to brew a decent pot of coffee here in
>> Japan. I can't speak for other countries, mind.
>>
>
> Starbucks here is considered "show off" coffee. Hey looka me, I can
> afford Starbucks!! woo hooooo .. NOT!!
>
> The best coffee here is what is known as coffee extract - made by
> soaking a pound of coffee and chicory grounds in 2 qts water over night
> and in the morning, filter into your container which is kept in the
> fridge. Then, to make a cup, use 1 to 1-1/2 oz extract in a cup with hot
> milk. This is true N'Awlins style cafe au lait
>
I can't vouch for its accuracy but http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicory
gives a history of the use of chicory as a substitute or additive for
coffee in the time of Frederick the Great of Prussia that seems entirely
plausible.

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Re: coffee

Jay Garcia
On 21.11.2013 08:13, James Silverton wrote:

 --- Original Message ---

> On 11/21/2013 8:30 AM, Jay Garcia wrote:
>> On 21.11.2013 06:01, Trane Francks wrote:
>>
>>   --- Original Message ---
>>
>>> On 11/20/13 5:53 PM +0900, Bob Henson wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On 20/11/2013 7:44 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>>>>> On 19/11/2013 20:42, James Silverton wrote:
>>>>>> On 11/19/2013 11:16 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>>>>>>> On 19/11/2013 16:13, rebro wrote:
>>>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in
>>>>>>>>> reference to
>>>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK
>>>>>>>>> is a
>>>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the
>>>>>>>>> custom
>>>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes
>>>>>>>> like
>>>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Most people who drink coffee at home drink instant, so not really.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Can you quote any reference for that statement about "most people"? I
>>>>>> have some instant in the freezer but I only drink it when real
>>>>>> coffee is
>>>>>> not available.
>>>>>>
>>>>> I seem to have trodden on some corns here.  I understood the original
>>>>> comment to be about the UK.  Apart from a few enthusiasts, we do not
>>>>> know as much about coffee as Americans.
>>>>
>>>> You must be joking. Have you tried the dirty hot water that Starbucks
>>>> serve instead of coffee?
>>>>
>>> I'm happy that Starbucks manages to brew a decent pot of coffee here in
>>> Japan. I can't speak for other countries, mind.
>>>
>>
>> Starbucks here is considered "show off" coffee. Hey looka me, I can
>> afford Starbucks!! woo hooooo .. NOT!!
>>
>> The best coffee here is what is known as coffee extract - made by
>> soaking a pound of coffee and chicory grounds in 2 qts water over night
>> and in the morning, filter into your container which is kept in the
>> fridge. Then, to make a cup, use 1 to 1-1/2 oz extract in a cup with hot
>> milk. This is true N'Awlins style cafe au lait
>>
> I can't vouch for its accuracy but http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicory
> gives a history of the use of chicory as a substitute or additive for
> coffee in the time of Frederick the Great of Prussia that seems entirely
> plausible.
>

The addition of chicory in the New Orleans blends is what adds that wake
up zing. Some of the more recognized brands of New Orleans coffee/chicory:

French Market - best by far
CDM
Community
Luzianne
Union - don't see too much of that nowadays but really good.

There are some private grocery store blends that also contain chicory.

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Re: coffee

Ron Hunter
In reply to this post by Bob Henson-4
On 11/21/2013 5:27 AM, Bob Henson wrote:

>
>
> On 21/11/2013 11:08 AM, Ron Hunter wrote:
>> On 11/21/2013 3:51 AM, Bob Henson wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> On 21/11/2013 8:20 AM, Ron Hunter wrote:
>>>> On 11/20/2013 8:35 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>>> Sailfish wrote:
>>>>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>>>>>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>>>>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>>>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>>>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>>>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>>>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>>>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>>>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>>>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>>>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>>>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>>>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>>>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>>>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>>>>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>>>>>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>>>>>> first made long before the war.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>>>>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>>>>>
>>>>>> Wow'sa!
>>>>>>
>>>>> Maybe  it was an additive during WWII But H&C, Louisanne, & JFG are
>>>>> still sold in South in the USA and they still have Chicory as an
>>>>> ingredient. This is even after 60 years. Since I learned at an early age
>>>>> to drink Strong Coffee I was able to drink most even terrible Coffee be
>>>>> okay with it.
>>>>>
>>>> Very often things that seem like deprivations during a war become
>>>> 'comfort food' afterwards.  A couple of examples from each side of the
>>>> pond are 'bangers and mash', and Spam.  Spam in the most popular product
>>>> line of Hormel, especially in Hawaii, where they sell 1100 varieties!
>>>> Amazing!
>>>>
>>>
>>> I'm not sure I should admit this publicly, but I have to say I love
>>> fried Spam - or better still Spam fritters. Actually, "loved" is more
>>> accurate - these days my cardiologist would have a heart attack if I was
>>> seen eating it. Maybe that's why I needed a cardiologist :-)
>>>
>>> Cardiologist's diet - If it tastes good, spit it out!
>>>
>> Bob,
>> I have eaten Spam for as long as I can recall, because it used to be
>> cheap, and we were poor.  It is 'comfort food' for me, and I eat it
>> several times a week, in moderation.  I have a couple of good recipes I
>> like, using it, and my wife also enjoys it.  I consider a few cans of
>> Spam 'standard' items for my pantry.  Never been to a cardiologist, but
>> my doctor never seems to have any comment when he checks my heart, or
>> lungs, or carotid artery, so I guess I am ok for being 71 next month.
>>
>
> I clock up 70 next month - so you're winning :-) You're also a better
> bet than me, I had a heart attack last year - hence the ban on too many
> fatty foods. Since "She Who Must Be Obeyed" still works, I'm chef these
> days - so I have no excuses whatsoever if the diet is bad!
>
I guess the bangers are off the menu too.  Getting old isn't for the
squeamish, is it?

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