coffee

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
738 messages Options
12345 ... 37
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

PhillipJones-2
Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:

> PhillipJones wrote:
>
>> I used a Mr Coffee Maker until I quit Coffee. A few years ago when I
>> discovered I had Diabetes.
>
> Why would you stop drinking coffee due to diabetes?  I've been a Type 2
> for a dozen years, and I still drink my pot or more a day. There's no carbs
> in coffee.
>
> Unless you added spoonsful of sugar to it...
>
No. I added no more than one teaspoon sugar and coffee Creamer. I was
just told by the Dr to stay away from Coffee.  I drink iced Green tea
now because its supposed to be good for diabetes.

--
Phillip M. Jones, C.E.T.      "If it's Fixed, Don't Break it"
http://www.phillipmjones.net    mailto:[hidden email]
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Martin Edwards-3
In reply to this post by WaltS48
On 19/11/2013 16:39, WaltS wrote:

> On 11/19/2013 11:16 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>> On 19/11/2013 16:13, rebro wrote:
>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>
>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>> here).
>>>
>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>> real coffee. :-)
>>
>>
>> Most people who drink coffee at home drink instant, so not really.
>>
>
>
> Opinion or you have facts to back up that claim?
>
> I use a coffee maker every morning.

In the UK.

--
Myth, after all, is what we believe naturally.  History is what we must
painfully learn and struggle to remember.  -Albert Goldman
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Martin Edwards-3
In reply to this post by Sailfish-4
On 19/11/2013 16:57, Sailfish wrote:

> My bloviated meandering follows what WaltS graced us with on 11/19/2013
> 8:39 AM:
>> On 11/19/2013 11:16 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>>> On 19/11/2013 16:13, rebro wrote:
>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>
>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>> here).
>>>>
>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>
>>> Most people who drink coffee at home drink instant, so not really.
>>
>> Opinion or you have facts to back up that claim?
>>
>> I use a coffee maker every morning.
>
> Agreed.
>
I understood the original comment to be about the UK, and it is
certainly true here.

--
Myth, after all, is what we believe naturally.  History is what we must
painfully learn and struggle to remember.  -Albert Goldman
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Martin Edwards-3
In reply to this post by James Silverton-3
On 19/11/2013 20:42, James Silverton wrote:

> On 11/19/2013 11:16 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>> On 19/11/2013 16:13, rebro wrote:
>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>
>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>> here).
>>>
>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>> real coffee. :-)
>>
>>
>> Most people who drink coffee at home drink instant, so not really.
>>
>
> Can you quote any reference for that statement about "most people"? I
> have some instant in the freezer but I only drink it when real coffee is
> not available.
>
I seem to have trodden on some corns here.  I understood the original
comment to be about the UK.  Apart from a few enthusiasts, we do not
know as much about coffee as Americans.  I do not myself drink it at
home, but I sometimes have a real one in a coffee bar, or in a cheap but
good value snackbar called Greggs.

--
Myth, after all, is what we believe naturally.  History is what we must
painfully learn and struggle to remember.  -Albert Goldman
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Bob Henson-4


On 20/11/2013 7:44 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:

> On 19/11/2013 20:42, James Silverton wrote:
>> On 11/19/2013 11:16 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>>> On 19/11/2013 16:13, rebro wrote:
>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>
>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>> here).
>>>>
>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>
>>>
>>> Most people who drink coffee at home drink instant, so not really.
>>>
>>
>> Can you quote any reference for that statement about "most people"? I
>> have some instant in the freezer but I only drink it when real coffee is
>> not available.
>>
> I seem to have trodden on some corns here.  I understood the original
> comment to be about the UK.  Apart from a few enthusiasts, we do not
> know as much about coffee as Americans.  

You must be joking. Have you tried the dirty hot water that Starbucks
serve instead of coffee?

--
Bob - Tetbury, Gloucestershire, UK

You know you're old when "getting lucky" means finding your car in the
car park.
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Bob Henson-4
In reply to this post by PhillipJones-2
On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:

> rebro wrote:
>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>
>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>> here).
>>
>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>> real coffee. :-)
>
> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother (granny
> Harris).
> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders, and
> anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>
> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always poured
> in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C (Harold & Carol)
> or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient. That what I learned to
> Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only thing is that she let it
> reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it could get up and walk
> around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>
> That was some good times. Back then.
>

Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
first made long before the war.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee

It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!

--
Bob - Tetbury, Gloucestershire, UK

Sign on a Maternity Ward Door: Push. PUSH! PUUUUUUSH!
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Ron Hunter
In reply to this post by Beauregard T. Shagnasty
On 11/19/2013 8:25 PM, Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:

> Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
>>> PhillipJones wrote:
>>>> I used a Mr Coffee Maker until I quit Coffee. A few years ago when I
>>>> discovered I had Diabetes.
>>>
>>> Why would you stop drinking coffee due to diabetes?  I've been a Type 2
>>> for a dozen years, and I still drink my pot or more a day. There's no
>>> carbs in coffee.
>>>
>>> Unless you added spoonsful of sugar to it...
>>
>> But plenty of caffeine which many people seem to think affects their BG.
>>    I suspect it might if you drink too much of it.
>
> Never once heard that. I assume your "BG" is Blood Glucose? Anyway, as I
> said, it (caffeine) doesn't affect my readings at all.
>
Nor mine, but some seem to think it does, and my doctor strongly
suggested no more than 300mg of caffeine a day.  Since I am not a coffee
drinker, it really is no particular problem. Caffeine will increase
blood pressure which IS a concern for me.

_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Ron Hunter
In reply to this post by PhillipJones-2
On 11/19/2013 10:13 PM, PhillipJones wrote:

> Beauregard T. Shagnasty wrote:
>> PhillipJones wrote:
>>
>>> I used a Mr Coffee Maker until I quit Coffee. A few years ago when I
>>> discovered I had Diabetes.
>>
>> Why would you stop drinking coffee due to diabetes?  I've been a Type 2
>> for a dozen years, and I still drink my pot or more a day. There's no
>> carbs
>> in coffee.
>>
>> Unless you added spoonsful of sugar to it...
>>
> No. I added no more than one teaspoon sugar and coffee Creamer. I was
> just told by the Dr to stay away from Coffee.  I drink iced Green tea
> now because its supposed to be good for diabetes.
>
The best thing I have found to eat to keep my blood glucose level down
is soup, either shrimp, or chicken noodle.

_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Mike Easter-2
In reply to this post by Ron Hunter
Ron Hunter wrote:
>Beauregard wrote:
>> Ron Hunter wrote:

>>> But plenty of caffeine which many people seem to think affects
>>> their BG. I suspect it might if you drink too much of it.
>>
>> Never once heard that. I assume your "BG" is Blood Glucose? Anyway,
>> as I said, it (caffeine) doesn't affect my readings at all.
>>
> Nor mine, but some seem to think it does, and my doctor strongly
> suggested no more than 300mg of caffeine a day. Since I am not a
> coffee drinker, it really is no particular problem. Caffeine will
> increase blood pressure which IS a concern for me.

 From back in the days when I used to read deadtree books, I find on the
shelf a paperback which I found to be full of useful info about caffeine
(and alcohol), so I used the title & author to dig up an amazon entry
that has a pretty extensive description of the book from which I pasted
a line below after the link


http://www.amazon.com/Buzz-Science-Lore-Alcohol-Caffeine-ebook/dp/B003ZHU1NG/ref=dp_kinw_strp_1/177-8117657-1430705 
  caffeine is far and away the most widely used mind altering substance
on the planet, found in tea, coffee, cocoa, chocolate, soft drinks, and
more than 2,000 non-prescription drugs. (Tea is the most popular drink
on earth, with coffee a close second.)



--
Mike Easter
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Sailfish-4
In reply to this post by Bob Henson-4
My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
11/20/2013 12:59 AM:

> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>> rebro wrote:
>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>
>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>> here).
>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>> real coffee. :-)
>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother (granny
>> Harris).
>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders, and
>> anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>
>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always poured
>> in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C (Harold & Carol)
>> or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient. That what I learned to
>> Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only thing is that she let it
>> reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it could get up and walk
>> around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>
>> That was some good times. Back then.
>
> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
> first made long before the war.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>
> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>
Wow'sa!

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/lcey2ex
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Sailfish-4
In reply to this post by Mike Easter-2
My bloviated meandering follows what Mike Easter graced us with on
11/20/2013 7:59 AM:

> Ron Hunter wrote:
>> Beauregard wrote:
>>> Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>>>> But plenty of caffeine which many people seem to think affects
>>>> their BG. I suspect it might if you drink too much of it.
>>>
>>> Never once heard that. I assume your "BG" is Blood Glucose? Anyway,
>>> as I said, it (caffeine) doesn't affect my readings at all.
>>>
>> Nor mine, but some seem to think it does, and my doctor strongly
>> suggested no more than 300mg of caffeine a day. Since I am not a
>> coffee drinker, it really is no particular problem. Caffeine will
>> increase blood pressure which IS a concern for me.
>
>  From back in the days when I used to read deadtree books, I find on the
> shelf a paperback which I found to be full of useful info about caffeine
> (and alcohol), so I used the title & author to dig up an amazon entry
> that has a pretty extensive description of the book from which I pasted
> a line below after the link
>
> http://www.amazon.com/Buzz-Science-Lore-Alcohol-Caffeine-ebook/dp/B003ZHU1NG/ref=dp_kinw_strp_1/177-8117657-1430705 
>  caffeine is far and away the most widely used mind altering substance
> on the planet, found in tea, coffee, cocoa, chocolate, soft drinks, and
> more than 2,000 non-prescription drugs. (Tea is the most popular drink
> on earth, with coffee a close second.)
>
I know it's the most used drinking substance in anime, far exceeding
that of coffee {as he now turns and slowly backs away}

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/lcey2ex
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Sailfish-4
In reply to this post by Martin Edwards-3
My bloviated meandering follows what Martin Edwards graced us with on
11/19/2013 11:39 PM:

> On 19/11/2013 16:57, Sailfish wrote:
>> My bloviated meandering follows what WaltS graced us with on 11/19/2013
>> 8:39 AM:
>>> On 11/19/2013 11:16 AM, Martin Edwards wrote:
>>>> On 19/11/2013 16:13, rebro wrote:
>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>> here).
>>>>>
>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>
>>>> Most people who drink coffee at home drink instant, so not really.
>>>
>>> Opinion or you have facts to back up that claim?
>>>
>>> I use a coffee maker every morning.
>>
>> Agreed.
>>
> I understood the original comment to be about the UK, and it is
> certainly true here.
>
It may even had been for a while back in the 60s in the US, I still
remember the "freeze-dried" commercials.

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/lcey2ex
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

James Silverton-3
In reply to this post by Sailfish-4
On 11/20/2013 12:09 PM, Sailfish wrote:

> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>> rebro wrote:
>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>
>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>> here).
>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>> (granny Harris).
>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>
>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>
>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>
>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>> first made long before the war.
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>
>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>
> Wow'sa!
>

That brought back memories! I don't think that Camp Coffee was ever
drunk without cream (or milk) and sugar; more or less as I drink
instant. Did you ever see the pictures that show the Indian servant
gradually morphing into an officer like the sahib and joining him for a
cup of "coffee". You can still buy "Camp coffee".

--

James Silverton ( NOT not.jim.silverton)
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Mike Easter-2
In reply to this post by Sailfish-4
Sailfish wrote:

> I still remember the "freeze-dried" commercials.

Freeze drying is a good way to remove the water from solutes without
doing much to damage the dissolved solutes; however, that process
doesn't address the problem of the wonderful 'volatiles' which are
responsible for coffee aroma which aroma is a VERY decidedly positive
contibutor to good coffee 'flavor'.

Ergo, when you remove (most of) the aroma from what might have
previously been OK coffee, the result is going to be disappointing to
almost all but the anosmic.


--
Mike Easter
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Mike Easter-2
Mike Easter wrote:
> Sailfish wrote:
>
>> I still remember the "freeze-dried" commercials.

> Ergo, when you remove (most of) the aroma from what might have
> previously been OK coffee, the result is going to be disappointing to
> almost all but the anosmic.

Here's an interesting article which includes quite a bit about the
problem and some (poor) solutions for astronaut coffee.

http://www.gizmag.com/space-coffee-as-you-like-it/27271/

The article contains some 'take-home' concepts:

Astronauts can choose from ordinary coffee (leaded or unleaded) and Kona
coffee. It comes black, with artificial sweetener, with cream(er), with
both, with sugar, or with cream(er) and sugar. And it all tastes bad.

"The key to freeze-dried food is Tabasco sauce." - The above quote is
from a hiker and hunter, but is apropos here.

An additional factor in our appreciation of food and drink is related to
the well-known psychological phenomenon of the Uncanny Valley. The
Uncanny Valley is a concept used to explain why humanoid robots are so
difficult to accept. If a robot is only vaguely humanoid, we take it for
what it is. However, if it is close enough to appearing human, we
concentrate on every aspect that makes it appear non-human, with the
usual result being a "creepy" feeling.

(And so forth)


--
Mike Easter
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Sailfish-4
In reply to this post by James Silverton-3
My bloviated meandering follows what James Silverton graced us with on
11/20/2013 9:56 AM:

> On 11/20/2013 12:09 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>> here).
>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>
>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>
>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>
>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>> first made long before the war.
>>>
>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>
>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>
>> Wow'sa!
>
> That brought back memories! I don't think that Camp Coffee was ever
> drunk without cream (or milk) and sugar; more or less as I drink
> instant. Did you ever see the pictures that show the Indian servant
> gradually morphing into an officer like the sahib and joining him for a
> cup of "coffee". You can still buy "Camp coffee".
>
I've not seen those pictures.

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/lcey2ex
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Sailfish-4
In reply to this post by Mike Easter-2
My bloviated meandering follows what Mike Easter graced us with on
11/20/2013 10:09 AM:

> Sailfish wrote:
>
>> I still remember the "freeze-dried" commercials.
>
> Freeze drying is a good way to remove the water from solutes without
> doing much to damage the dissolved solutes; however, that process
> doesn't address the problem of the wonderful 'volatiles' which are
> responsible for coffee aroma which aroma is a VERY decidedly positive
> contibutor to good coffee 'flavor'.
>
> Ergo, when you remove (most of) the aroma from what might have
> previously been OK coffee, the result is going to be disappointing to
> almost all but the anosmic.
>
Do tell. I knew right away that while freeze-dried instant tasted
different than regular instant, that was all it did and it certainly
NEVER approached the great taste of a good cup of fresh made coffee.

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/lcey2ex
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Ron Hunter
In reply to this post by Mike Easter-2
On 11/20/2013 12:23 PM, Mike Easter wrote:

> Mike Easter wrote:
>> Sailfish wrote:
>>
>>> I still remember the "freeze-dried" commercials.
>
>> Ergo, when you remove (most of) the aroma from what might have
>> previously been OK coffee, the result is going to be disappointing to
>> almost all but the anosmic.
>
> Here's an interesting article which includes quite a bit about the
> problem and some (poor) solutions for astronaut coffee.
>
> http://www.gizmag.com/space-coffee-as-you-like-it/27271/
>
> The article contains some 'take-home' concepts:
>
> Astronauts can choose from ordinary coffee (leaded or unleaded) and Kona
> coffee. It comes black, with artificial sweetener, with cream(er), with
> both, with sugar, or with cream(er) and sugar. And it all tastes bad.
>
> "The key to freeze-dried food is Tabasco sauce." - The above quote is
> from a hiker and hunter, but is apropos here.
>
> An additional factor in our appreciation of food and drink is related to
> the well-known psychological phenomenon of the Uncanny Valley. The
> Uncanny Valley is a concept used to explain why humanoid robots are so
> difficult to accept. If a robot is only vaguely humanoid, we take it for
> what it is. However, if it is close enough to appearing human, we
> concentrate on every aspect that makes it appear non-human, with the
> usual result being a "creepy" feeling.
>
> (And so forth)
>
>
For some of us ALL coffee tastes terrible.  'Bad' doesn't come close.

_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

James Silverton-3
In reply to this post by Sailfish-4
On 11/20/2013 1:52 PM, Sailfish wrote:

> My bloviated meandering follows what James Silverton graced us with on
> 11/20/2013 9:56 AM:
>> On 11/20/2013 12:09 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Bob Henson graced us with on
>>> 11/20/2013 12:59 AM:
>>>> On 19/11/2013 8:31 PM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>>> rebro wrote:
>>>>>> Am 19.11.2013 16:14, schrieb Ron Hunter:
>>>>>>> I made a reference to waking up to smell the coffee, in reference to
>>>>>>> British, so here is something interesting.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> UK market for coffee was valued at £1,064 million in 2011 and is
>>>>>>> forecast to grow by at least 10% in the next two years.
>>>>>>> According to the article, 57% of the coffee consumed in the UK is a
>>>>>>> breakfast drink (or instead of a proper breakfast, as is the custom
>>>>>>> here).
>>>>>> ... and apart from being black and hot it meanwhile even tastes like
>>>>>> real coffee. :-)
>>>>> Talking about coffee, brings back fond memories my grandmother
>>>>> (granny Harris).
>>>>> To make a living because was a widow, she ran a boarding house. she
>>>>> besides renting out rooms, she served 3 meal a day to th boarders,
>>>>> and anyone else that wanted to take a meal.
>>>>>
>>>>> She had this 50 cup Dripalator Coffeemaker that stood on a Claw-foot
>>>>> stand. (If you've been in a restaurant or Hamburger joint that been
>>>>> around for 100 years, you may have seen one.) Any way, She always
>>>>> poured in a new Bag of either Standard Bran Louisanne,   H & C
>>>>> (Harold & Carol) or JFG coffee. All used Chicory as an ingredient.
>>>>> That what I learned to Drink as coffee and 12 years old. The only
>>>>> thing is that she let it reheat and re perk. By the end of the day it
>>>>> could get up and walk around by itself or use it for Paint remover.
>>>>>
>>>>> That was some good times. Back then.
>>>>
>>>> Urrrrggh! Wasn't chicory the adulterant they put in the coffee during
>>>> the war when we couldn't get the real stuff? We used to have a thing in
>>>> the UK called "Camp" coffee that was made of chicory - actually it was
>>>> first made long before the war.
>>>>
>>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camp_Coffee
>>>>
>>>> It was utterly disgusting. My paternal grandparents actually liked the
>>>> stuff, which is how I came to taste it - once!
>>>>
>>> Wow'sa!
>>
>> That brought back memories! I don't think that Camp Coffee was ever
>> drunk without cream (or milk) and sugar; more or less as I drink
>> instant. Did you ever see the pictures that show the Indian servant
>> gradually morphing into an officer like the sahib and joining him for
>> a cup of "coffee". You can still buy "Camp coffee".
>>
> I've not seen those pictures.
>
I did a quick search and found "images for camp coffee" that, among
others, shows the different labels tho' not entirely in sequence.

--

James Silverton ( NOT not.jim.silverton)
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: coffee

Mike Easter-2
In reply to this post by Ron Hunter
Ron Hunter wrote:
> Mike Easter wrote:

>> Astronauts can choose from ordinary coffee (leaded or unleaded) and Kona
>> coffee. It comes black, with artificial sweetener, with cream(er), with
>> both, with sugar, or with cream(er) and sugar. And it all tastes bad.

> For some of us ALL coffee tastes terrible.  'Bad' doesn't come close.

I was surprised by the stat that tea drinking exceeds coffee.

I think some of those stats must go 'up and down'.  Surely the Starbucks
expansion craze and all of its siblings which evolved must've had an
impact on some stats.  And then of course Starbucks bought Teavana and
also started opening coffee places in countries like Japan.

Personally I almost never go out to buy prepared coffee unless it is
'unavoidable'.

When I go on a trip I 'pre-grind' some beans and take along the 'bean
powder' and some filters in anticipation of finding something to brew my
own coffee so that I don't have to go out and find some.



--
Mike Easter
_______________________________________________
general mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/general
12345 ... 37