Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

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Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Lawrence Mandel-2
Four years ago Mozilla moved to a fixed-schedule release model, otherwise
known as the Train Model
<https://blog.mozilla.org/channels/2011/07/18/every-six-weeks/>, in which
we released Firefox every six weeks to get features and updates to users
faster and move at the speed of the Web. We studied the process carefully
and learned a lot. We have also identified additional areas for improvement
and it’s time we iterate again.

We are moving to a variably scheduled six-to-eight week release cycle for
Firefox. With this new release cycle, we will deliver the same number of
releases per year but gain a few significant benefits over the previous six
week fixed model.

For example, we will now be able to adjust release dates to respond to
emerging user and market needs and provide at least six working weeks for
every release. We also want to help support the well-being and
connectedness of our global Mozilla community by specifically allowing time
for holidays.

You’ll find the 2016 Firefox release schedule listed below and in the
following Wiki <https://wiki.mozilla.org/RapidRelease/Calendar>.


This note has also been posted to the Future of Firefox blog
<https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2016/02/04/update-on-2016-firefox-release-schedule>
.


2016 Firefox Release Schedule

2016-01-26 - Firefox 44

2016-03-08 - Firefox 45, ESR 45 (6 weeks cycle)

2016-04-19 - Firefox 46 (6 weeks cycle)

2016-06-07 - Firefox 47 (7 weeks cycle)

2016-08-02 - Firefox 48 (8 weeks cycle)

2016-09-13 - Firefox 49 (6 weeks cycle)

2016-11-08 - Firefox 50 (8 weeks cycle)

2016-12-13 - Firefox 50.0.1 (5 week cycle, release for critical fixes as
needed)

2017-01-24 - Firefox 51 (6 weeks from prior release)

Note: Firefox ESR will continue to ship point releases on the same day that
Firefox ships.


Lawrence
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Re: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Dave Herman
I'm concerned about the suggestion that we could start delaying trains,
especially on an ad hoc basis. Trains work because of predictability and
frequency.

It's hard for me to quite understand the rationale behind varying the
schedule, but if it's because of things like quality issues, say, from
shipping features before they're adequately tested, then delaying trains
will actually exacerbate the problems, not fix them. The less people can
depend on trains, the more pressure they will feel to ship early, which is
precisely the thing you were trying to address. If the problem with
holidays and such is that people are trying to cram features in at the last
minute, then again, delaying trains and making them less predictable will
exacerbate that.

Regardless of the rationale, adding variability and uncertainty into the
train system works directly at odds with what it has been so successful at
achieving -- not just for Firefox, but for Chrome and Rust, for example.
This isn't a small thing: giving credit where due, I see trains as the best
thing Chrome ever did for the web. It's been one of the biggest drivers in
pushing the platform forward. I would hate to see us regress in our
contribution to that part of our mission.

Dave

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 12:50 PM, Lawrence Mandel <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> Four years ago Mozilla moved to a fixed-schedule release model, otherwise
> known as the Train Model
> <https://blog.mozilla.org/channels/2011/07/18/every-six-weeks/>, in which
> we released Firefox every six weeks to get features and updates to users
> faster and move at the speed of the Web. We studied the process carefully
> and learned a lot. We have also identified additional areas for improvement
> and it’s time we iterate again.
>
> We are moving to a variably scheduled six-to-eight week release cycle for
> Firefox. With this new release cycle, we will deliver the same number of
> releases per year but gain a few significant benefits over the previous six
> week fixed model.
>
> For example, we will now be able to adjust release dates to respond to
> emerging user and market needs and provide at least six working weeks for
> every release. We also want to help support the well-being and
> connectedness of our global Mozilla community by specifically allowing time
> for holidays.
>
> You’ll find the 2016 Firefox release schedule listed below and in the
> following Wiki <https://wiki.mozilla.org/RapidRelease/Calendar>.
>
>
> This note has also been posted to the Future of Firefox blog
> <
> https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2016/02/04/update-on-2016-firefox-release-schedule
> >
> .
>
>
> 2016 Firefox Release Schedule
>
> 2016-01-26 - Firefox 44
>
> 2016-03-08 - Firefox 45, ESR 45 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-04-19 - Firefox 46 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-06-07 - Firefox 47 (7 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-08-02 - Firefox 48 (8 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-09-13 - Firefox 49 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-11-08 - Firefox 50 (8 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-12-13 - Firefox 50.0.1 (5 week cycle, release for critical fixes as
> needed)
>
> 2017-01-24 - Firefox 51 (6 weeks from prior release)
>
> Note: Firefox ESR will continue to ship point releases on the same day that
> Firefox ships.
>
>
> Lawrence
> _______________________________________________
> dev-planning mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
>
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Re: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Andrew McKay
I think this new schedule is great.

But as someone new to the process I saw a lot of pain shipping Firefox 43
between Mozlando and Christmas, people were finding mission critical issues
and trying to fix them, whilst being on holiday. The pressure and stress I
saw often led to the question"exactly why do we need to ship right now
instead of waiting a couple of weeks?".

It seems the cost to the team, the developer community and Firefox users
isn't worth it unless we can get that shipping smoother and more reliable.
The real answer is to find a way to ship Firefox easier and smoother and I
think everyone is working towards that.

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 5:10 PM, Dave Herman <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I'm concerned about the suggestion that we could start delaying trains,
> especially on an ad hoc basis. Trains work because of predictability and
> frequency.
>
> It's hard for me to quite understand the rationale behind varying the
> schedule, but if it's because of things like quality issues, say, from
> shipping features before they're adequately tested, then delaying trains
> will actually exacerbate the problems, not fix them. The less people can
> depend on trains, the more pressure they will feel to ship early, which is
> precisely the thing you were trying to address. If the problem with
> holidays and such is that people are trying to cram features in at the last
> minute, then again, delaying trains and making them less predictable will
> exacerbate that.
>
> Regardless of the rationale, adding variability and uncertainty into the
> train system works directly at odds with what it has been so successful at
> achieving -- not just for Firefox, but for Chrome and Rust, for example.
> This isn't a small thing: giving credit where due, I see trains as the best
> thing Chrome ever did for the web. It's been one of the biggest drivers in
> pushing the platform forward. I would hate to see us regress in our
> contribution to that part of our mission.
>
> Dave
>
> On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 12:50 PM, Lawrence Mandel <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > Four years ago Mozilla moved to a fixed-schedule release model, otherwise
> > known as the Train Model
> > <https://blog.mozilla.org/channels/2011/07/18/every-six-weeks/>, in
> which
> > we released Firefox every six weeks to get features and updates to users
> > faster and move at the speed of the Web. We studied the process carefully
> > and learned a lot. We have also identified additional areas for
> improvement
> > and it’s time we iterate again.
> >
> > We are moving to a variably scheduled six-to-eight week release cycle for
> > Firefox. With this new release cycle, we will deliver the same number of
> > releases per year but gain a few significant benefits over the previous
> six
> > week fixed model.
> >
> > For example, we will now be able to adjust release dates to respond to
> > emerging user and market needs and provide at least six working weeks for
> > every release. We also want to help support the well-being and
> > connectedness of our global Mozilla community by specifically allowing
> time
> > for holidays.
> >
> > You’ll find the 2016 Firefox release schedule listed below and in the
> > following Wiki <https://wiki.mozilla.org/RapidRelease/Calendar>.
> >
> >
> > This note has also been posted to the Future of Firefox blog
> > <
> >
> https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2016/02/04/update-on-2016-firefox-release-schedule
> > >
> > .
> >
> >
> > 2016 Firefox Release Schedule
> >
> > 2016-01-26 - Firefox 44
> >
> > 2016-03-08 - Firefox 45, ESR 45 (6 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-04-19 - Firefox 46 (6 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-06-07 - Firefox 47 (7 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-08-02 - Firefox 48 (8 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-09-13 - Firefox 49 (6 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-11-08 - Firefox 50 (8 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-12-13 - Firefox 50.0.1 (5 week cycle, release for critical fixes as
> > needed)
> >
> > 2017-01-24 - Firefox 51 (6 weeks from prior release)
> >
> > Note: Firefox ESR will continue to ship point releases on the same day
> that
> > Firefox ships.
> >
> >
> > Lawrence
> > _______________________________________________
> > dev-planning mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
> >
> _______________________________________________
> dev-planning mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
>
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Re: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Mike Connor-4
I'm also a huge fan of this optimization.  I understand Dave's concern, and
I think we need to keep an eye on things. However, I also believe that a
perfectly fixed schedule has caused considerable strain and pressure over
the last four years, which has contributed to a significant number of
 *.0.1 releases.  I'm hopeful that this relatively small tweak will help us
better manage these releases.

One thing that is implied from the release schedule, but not explicitly
addressed, is the idea of making the December release a critical bugfix
release (I'd look at that as 50.1 vs. 50.0.1), rather than a major release
with new features. Most (probably all) of our commercial partners have
production code lockdowns from around mid-November through January 1st,
given the critical commercial importance of the holiday season.  Anything
we can do to reduce risk/impact for web/add-on compat at that time of year
will help our users and the Web as a whole.

The second implication of the critical bugfix cycle is that ESR would
effectively shift to an annual cadence, which I believe will be positively
received by the enterprise community.  Solid, predictable updates would be
a win for those folks.

Thanks to everyone involved in pushing this forward, I think it's a great
step forward.

-- Mike

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 6:19 PM, Andrew McKay <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I think this new schedule is great.
>
> But as someone new to the process I saw a lot of pain shipping Firefox 43
> between Mozlando and Christmas, people were finding mission critical issues
> and trying to fix them, whilst being on holiday. The pressure and stress I
> saw often led to the question"exactly why do we need to ship right now
> instead of waiting a couple of weeks?".
>
> It seems the cost to the team, the developer community and Firefox users
> isn't worth it unless we can get that shipping smoother and more reliable.
> The real answer is to find a way to ship Firefox easier and smoother and I
> think everyone is working towards that.
>
> On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 5:10 PM, Dave Herman <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > I'm concerned about the suggestion that we could start delaying trains,
> > especially on an ad hoc basis. Trains work because of predictability and
> > frequency.
> >
> > It's hard for me to quite understand the rationale behind varying the
> > schedule, but if it's because of things like quality issues, say, from
> > shipping features before they're adequately tested, then delaying trains
> > will actually exacerbate the problems, not fix them. The less people can
> > depend on trains, the more pressure they will feel to ship early, which
> is
> > precisely the thing you were trying to address. If the problem with
> > holidays and such is that people are trying to cram features in at the
> last
> > minute, then again, delaying trains and making them less predictable will
> > exacerbate that.
> >
> > Regardless of the rationale, adding variability and uncertainty into the
> > train system works directly at odds with what it has been so successful
> at
> > achieving -- not just for Firefox, but for Chrome and Rust, for example.
> > This isn't a small thing: giving credit where due, I see trains as the
> best
> > thing Chrome ever did for the web. It's been one of the biggest drivers
> in
> > pushing the platform forward. I would hate to see us regress in our
> > contribution to that part of our mission.
> >
> > Dave
> >
> > On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 12:50 PM, Lawrence Mandel <[hidden email]>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > Four years ago Mozilla moved to a fixed-schedule release model,
> otherwise
> > > known as the Train Model
> > > <https://blog.mozilla.org/channels/2011/07/18/every-six-weeks/>, in
> > which
> > > we released Firefox every six weeks to get features and updates to
> users
> > > faster and move at the speed of the Web. We studied the process
> carefully
> > > and learned a lot. We have also identified additional areas for
> > improvement
> > > and it’s time we iterate again.
> > >
> > > We are moving to a variably scheduled six-to-eight week release cycle
> for
> > > Firefox. With this new release cycle, we will deliver the same number
> of
> > > releases per year but gain a few significant benefits over the previous
> > six
> > > week fixed model.
> > >
> > > For example, we will now be able to adjust release dates to respond to
> > > emerging user and market needs and provide at least six working weeks
> for
> > > every release. We also want to help support the well-being and
> > > connectedness of our global Mozilla community by specifically allowing
> > time
> > > for holidays.
> > >
> > > You’ll find the 2016 Firefox release schedule listed below and in the
> > > following Wiki <https://wiki.mozilla.org/RapidRelease/Calendar>.
> > >
> > >
> > > This note has also been posted to the Future of Firefox blog
> > > <
> > >
> >
> https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2016/02/04/update-on-2016-firefox-release-schedule
> > > >
> > > .
> > >
> > >
> > > 2016 Firefox Release Schedule
> > >
> > > 2016-01-26 - Firefox 44
> > >
> > > 2016-03-08 - Firefox 45, ESR 45 (6 weeks cycle)
> > >
> > > 2016-04-19 - Firefox 46 (6 weeks cycle)
> > >
> > > 2016-06-07 - Firefox 47 (7 weeks cycle)
> > >
> > > 2016-08-02 - Firefox 48 (8 weeks cycle)
> > >
> > > 2016-09-13 - Firefox 49 (6 weeks cycle)
> > >
> > > 2016-11-08 - Firefox 50 (8 weeks cycle)
> > >
> > > 2016-12-13 - Firefox 50.0.1 (5 week cycle, release for critical fixes
> as
> > > needed)
> > >
> > > 2017-01-24 - Firefox 51 (6 weeks from prior release)
> > >
> > > Note: Firefox ESR will continue to ship point releases on the same day
> > that
> > > Firefox ships.
> > >
> > >
> > > Lawrence
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > dev-planning mailing list
> > > [hidden email]
> > > https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
> > >
> > _______________________________________________
> > dev-planning mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
> >
> _______________________________________________
> dev-planning mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
>
_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
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Re: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Lawrence Mandel-2
In reply to this post by Dave Herman
Hi Dave,

Thank you for sharing your concern.

You're right. We want predictability and certainty in our release schedule.
This change to the train model still allows for that and provides
additional flexibility with respect to selecting the release dates. As an
example of where this would have been beneficial in 2015, the six week
model did not align with the release of Windows 10. It would have been
preferable to schedule a release to coincide with this industry event.

The schedule for 2016 has been published and there is no intention to
change any of the dates. The release dates should continue to be published
well in advance to make it very clear when we will release.

Lawrence



On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 8:10 PM, Dave Herman <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I'm concerned about the suggestion that we could start delaying trains,
> especially on an ad hoc basis. Trains work because of predictability and
> frequency.
>
> It's hard for me to quite understand the rationale behind varying the
> schedule, but if it's because of things like quality issues, say, from
> shipping features before they're adequately tested, then delaying trains
> will actually exacerbate the problems, not fix them. The less people can
> depend on trains, the more pressure they will feel to ship early, which is
> precisely the thing you were trying to address. If the problem with
> holidays and such is that people are trying to cram features in at the last
> minute, then again, delaying trains and making them less predictable will
> exacerbate that.
>
> Regardless of the rationale, adding variability and uncertainty into the
> train system works directly at odds with what it has been so successful at
> achieving -- not just for Firefox, but for Chrome and Rust, for example.
> This isn't a small thing: giving credit where due, I see trains as the best
> thing Chrome ever did for the web. It's been one of the biggest drivers in
> pushing the platform forward. I would hate to see us regress in our
> contribution to that part of our mission.
>
> Dave
>
> On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 12:50 PM, Lawrence Mandel <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
>> Four years ago Mozilla moved to a fixed-schedule release model, otherwise
>> known as the Train Model
>> <https://blog.mozilla.org/channels/2011/07/18/every-six-weeks/>, in which
>> we released Firefox every six weeks to get features and updates to users
>> faster and move at the speed of the Web. We studied the process carefully
>> and learned a lot. We have also identified additional areas for
>> improvement
>> and it’s time we iterate again.
>>
>> We are moving to a variably scheduled six-to-eight week release cycle for
>> Firefox. With this new release cycle, we will deliver the same number of
>> releases per year but gain a few significant benefits over the previous
>> six
>> week fixed model.
>>
>> For example, we will now be able to adjust release dates to respond to
>> emerging user and market needs and provide at least six working weeks for
>> every release. We also want to help support the well-being and
>> connectedness of our global Mozilla community by specifically allowing
>> time
>> for holidays.
>>
>> You’ll find the 2016 Firefox release schedule listed below and in the
>> following Wiki <https://wiki.mozilla.org/RapidRelease/Calendar>.
>>
>>
>> This note has also been posted to the Future of Firefox blog
>> <
>> https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2016/02/04/update-on-2016-firefox-release-schedule
>> >
>> .
>>
>>
>> 2016 Firefox Release Schedule
>>
>> 2016-01-26 - Firefox 44
>>
>> 2016-03-08 - Firefox 45, ESR 45 (6 weeks cycle)
>>
>> 2016-04-19 - Firefox 46 (6 weeks cycle)
>>
>> 2016-06-07 - Firefox 47 (7 weeks cycle)
>>
>> 2016-08-02 - Firefox 48 (8 weeks cycle)
>>
>> 2016-09-13 - Firefox 49 (6 weeks cycle)
>>
>> 2016-11-08 - Firefox 50 (8 weeks cycle)
>>
>> 2016-12-13 - Firefox 50.0.1 (5 week cycle, release for critical fixes as
>> needed)
>>
>> 2017-01-24 - Firefox 51 (6 weeks from prior release)
>>
>> Note: Firefox ESR will continue to ship point releases on the same day
>> that
>> Firefox ships.
>>
>>
>> Lawrence
>> _______________________________________________
>> dev-planning mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
>>
>
>
_______________________________________________
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Re: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Benjamin Kerensa
In reply to this post by Lawrence Mandel-2
Having worked on releases in the past near the holidays and hoping to dive
back
in I think the news of variable release cycles is great.

I think this will allow Mozilla to deliver higher quality releases to our
users
and allow teams the flexibility to get a release right and not be
constrained
by hard deadlines.

On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 12:50 PM, Lawrence Mandel <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> Four years ago Mozilla moved to a fixed-schedule release model, otherwise
> known as the Train Model
> <https://blog.mozilla.org/channels/2011/07/18/every-six-weeks/>, in which
> we released Firefox every six weeks to get features and updates to users
> faster and move at the speed of the Web. We studied the process carefully
> and learned a lot. We have also identified additional areas for improvement
> and it’s time we iterate again.
>
> We are moving to a variably scheduled six-to-eight week release cycle for
> Firefox. With this new release cycle, we will deliver the same number of
> releases per year but gain a few significant benefits over the previous six
> week fixed model.
>
> For example, we will now be able to adjust release dates to respond to
> emerging user and market needs and provide at least six working weeks for
> every release. We also want to help support the well-being and
> connectedness of our global Mozilla community by specifically allowing time
> for holidays.
>
> You’ll find the 2016 Firefox release schedule listed below and in the
> following Wiki <https://wiki.mozilla.org/RapidRelease/Calendar>.
>
>
> This note has also been posted to the Future of Firefox blog
> <
> https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2016/02/04/update-on-2016-firefox-release-schedule
> >
> .
>
>
> 2016 Firefox Release Schedule
>
> 2016-01-26 - Firefox 44
>
> 2016-03-08 - Firefox 45, ESR 45 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-04-19 - Firefox 46 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-06-07 - Firefox 47 (7 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-08-02 - Firefox 48 (8 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-09-13 - Firefox 49 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-11-08 - Firefox 50 (8 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-12-13 - Firefox 50.0.1 (5 week cycle, release for critical fixes as
> needed)
>
> 2017-01-24 - Firefox 51 (6 weeks from prior release)
>
> Note: Firefox ESR will continue to ship point releases on the same day that
> Firefox ships.
>
>
> Lawrence
> _______________________________________________
> dev-planning mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
>



--
Benjamin Kerensa
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RE: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Florin Mezei
In reply to this post by Lawrence Mandel-2
Looks good to me.

Two questions:
1. Based on the dates below, it seems to me that in the period Nov 8 2016 - Jan 24 2017 we would basically have 11 weeks in which we have: Nightly=53, Aurora=52, Beta=51. Is my understanding correct?
2. Will we also update the gcal: https://goo.gl/W6ckwD?

Regards,
Florin.

-----Original Message-----
From: dev-planning [mailto:dev-planning-bounces+florin.mezei=[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Lawrence Mandel
Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 10:51 PM
To: dev-planning <[hidden email]>
Subject: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Four years ago Mozilla moved to a fixed-schedule release model, otherwise known as the Train Model <https://blog.mozilla.org/channels/2011/07/18/every-six-weeks/>, in which we released Firefox every six weeks to get features and updates to users faster and move at the speed of the Web. We studied the process carefully and learned a lot. We have also identified additional areas for improvement and it’s time we iterate again.

We are moving to a variably scheduled six-to-eight week release cycle for Firefox. With this new release cycle, we will deliver the same number of releases per year but gain a few significant benefits over the previous six week fixed model.

For example, we will now be able to adjust release dates to respond to emerging user and market needs and provide at least six working weeks for every release. We also want to help support the well-being and connectedness of our global Mozilla community by specifically allowing time for holidays.

You’ll find the 2016 Firefox release schedule listed below and in the following Wiki <https://wiki.mozilla.org/RapidRelease/Calendar>.


This note has also been posted to the Future of Firefox blog <https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2016/02/04/update-on-2016-firefox-release-schedule>
.


2016 Firefox Release Schedule

2016-01-26 - Firefox 44

2016-03-08 - Firefox 45, ESR 45 (6 weeks cycle)

2016-04-19 - Firefox 46 (6 weeks cycle)

2016-06-07 - Firefox 47 (7 weeks cycle)

2016-08-02 - Firefox 48 (8 weeks cycle)

2016-09-13 - Firefox 49 (6 weeks cycle)

2016-11-08 - Firefox 50 (8 weeks cycle)

2016-12-13 - Firefox 50.0.1 (5 week cycle, release for critical fixes as
needed)

2017-01-24 - Firefox 51 (6 weeks from prior release)

Note: Firefox ESR will continue to ship point releases on the same day that Firefox ships.


Lawrence
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Re: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Axel Hecht
In reply to this post by Lawrence Mandel-2
On 05/02/16 11:32, Florin Mezei wrote:
> Looks good to me.
>
> Two questions:
> 1. Based on the dates below, it seems to me that in the period Nov 8 2016 - Jan 24 2017 we would basically have 11 weeks in which we have: Nightly=53, Aurora=52, Beta=51. Is my understanding correct?
That's what I understand, too.

Now, given it's workweek and holiday season, that's probably more like 8
weeks of actual development.

I am wondering what we're expecting in terms of uplift requests, though.
Both in terms of what's trying to get into 50, and also what's expected
to get into 50.0.x?

Axel

> 2. Will we also update the gcal: https://goo.gl/W6ckwD?
>
> Regards,
> Florin.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: dev-planning [mailto:dev-planning-bounces+florin.mezei=[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Lawrence Mandel
> Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 10:51 PM
> To: dev-planning <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule
>
> Four years ago Mozilla moved to a fixed-schedule release model, otherwise known as the Train Model <https://blog.mozilla.org/channels/2011/07/18/every-six-weeks/>, in which we released Firefox every six weeks to get features and updates to users faster and move at the speed of the Web. We studied the process carefully and learned a lot. We have also identified additional areas for improvement and it’s time we iterate again.
>
> We are moving to a variably scheduled six-to-eight week release cycle for Firefox. With this new release cycle, we will deliver the same number of releases per year but gain a few significant benefits over the previous six week fixed model.
>
> For example, we will now be able to adjust release dates to respond to emerging user and market needs and provide at least six working weeks for every release. We also want to help support the well-being and connectedness of our global Mozilla community by specifically allowing time for holidays.
>
> You’ll find the 2016 Firefox release schedule listed below and in the following Wiki <https://wiki.mozilla.org/RapidRelease/Calendar>.
>
>
> This note has also been posted to the Future of Firefox blog <https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2016/02/04/update-on-2016-firefox-release-schedule>
> .
>
>
> 2016 Firefox Release Schedule
>
> 2016-01-26 - Firefox 44
>
> 2016-03-08 - Firefox 45, ESR 45 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-04-19 - Firefox 46 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-06-07 - Firefox 47 (7 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-08-02 - Firefox 48 (8 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-09-13 - Firefox 49 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-11-08 - Firefox 50 (8 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-12-13 - Firefox 50.0.1 (5 week cycle, release for critical fixes as
> needed)
>
> 2017-01-24 - Firefox 51 (6 weeks from prior release)
>
> Note: Firefox ESR will continue to ship point releases on the same day that Firefox ships.
>
>
> Lawrence
> _______________________________________________
> dev-planning mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
>

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Re: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Sylvestre Ledru-2


Le 05/02/2016 14:01, Axel Hecht a écrit :
> Now, given it's workweek and holiday season, that's probably more like
8 weeks of actual development.
That was our rational when we choose these dates.
We also expect people to take pto before/after the workweek.

> Both in terms of what's trying to get into 50, and also what's
> expected to get into 50.0.x?
50 will be just like any other release.
50.0.1 will be a security focus release.

Sylvestre

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RE: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Lawrence Mandel-2
In reply to this post by Florin Mezei
On Feb 5, 2016 5:32 AM, "Florin Mezei" <[hidden email]>
wrote:
>
> Looks good to me.
>
> Two questions:
> 1. Based on the dates below, it seems to me that in the period Nov 8 2016
- Jan 24 2017 we would basically have 11 weeks in which we have:
Nightly=53, Aurora=52, Beta=51. Is my understanding correct?
> 2. Will we also update the gcal: https://goo.gl/W6ckwD?

Yes and yes.

Lawrence

>
> Regards,
> Florin.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: dev-planning [mailto:dev-planning-bounces+florin.mezei=
[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Lawrence Mandel
> Sent: Thursday, February 04, 2016 10:51 PM
> To: dev-planning <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule
>
> Four years ago Mozilla moved to a fixed-schedule release model, otherwise
known as the Train Model <
https://blog.mozilla.org/channels/2011/07/18/every-six-weeks/>, in which we
released Firefox every six weeks to get features and updates to users
faster and move at the speed of the Web. We studied the process carefully
and learned a lot. We have also identified additional areas for improvement
and it’s time we iterate again.
>
> We are moving to a variably scheduled six-to-eight week release cycle for
Firefox. With this new release cycle, we will deliver the same number of
releases per year but gain a few significant benefits over the previous six
week fixed model.
>
> For example, we will now be able to adjust release dates to respond to
emerging user and market needs and provide at least six working weeks for
every release. We also want to help support the well-being and
connectedness of our global Mozilla community by specifically allowing time
for holidays.
>
> You’ll find the 2016 Firefox release schedule listed below and in the
following Wiki <https://wiki.mozilla.org/RapidRelease/Calendar>.
>
>
> This note has also been posted to the Future of Firefox blog <
https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2016/02/04/update-on-2016-firefox-release-schedule

>
> .
>
>
> 2016 Firefox Release Schedule
>
> 2016-01-26 - Firefox 44
>
> 2016-03-08 - Firefox 45, ESR 45 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-04-19 - Firefox 46 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-06-07 - Firefox 47 (7 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-08-02 - Firefox 48 (8 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-09-13 - Firefox 49 (6 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-11-08 - Firefox 50 (8 weeks cycle)
>
> 2016-12-13 - Firefox 50.0.1 (5 week cycle, release for critical fixes as
> needed)
>
> 2017-01-24 - Firefox 51 (6 weeks from prior release)
>
> Note: Firefox ESR will continue to ship point releases on the same day
that Firefox ships.
>
>
> Lawrence
> _______________________________________________
> dev-planning mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
>
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Re: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Chris Hofmann-2
In reply to this post by Dave Herman
On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 5:10 PM, Dave Herman <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I'm concerned about the suggestion that we could start delaying trains,
> especially on an ad hoc basis. Trains work because of predictability and
> frequency.
>
> It's hard for me to quite understand the rationale behind varying the
> schedule, but if it's because of things like quality issues, say, from
> shipping features before they're adequately tested, then delaying trains
> will actually exacerbate the problems, not fix them. The less people can
> depend on trains, the more pressure they will feel to ship early, which is
> precisely the thing you were trying to address. If the problem with
> holidays and such is that people are trying to cram features in at the last
> minute, then again, delaying trains and making them less predictable will
> exacerbate that.
>

A bunch of thoughts to share on this but I'll just share three and then try
to catch you for a beer to talk about the others.

The first on this point about being pressured to cram features or even
prematurely tested regression bug fixes on to trains, or even jump trains
with them.

Quality is only going to get better if we find ways to remove that pressure
and take the time and effort to analyze and test each change that we make.
As dbaron said back in Portland "we have an uneven amount of time and
effort applied to testing" (roughtly quoting).  Poorly constructed changes
that aren't well tested and are under presume to land are a big source of
our problems so lets just find ways to take that issue head on.  The
presure can come in many forms.  People telling engineers that "we've got
to get this feature or bug fix shipped..."  is one.  Engineers thinking "I
just want to get this patch checked in..."  is another.  Those are watch
words to look for danger.

The other thing about the trains is that its killed a lot of motivation for
people to get involved and passionate around helping to test.  The
motivation has been replaced with the attitude that is "why should I
bother, you are just going to ship this thing anyway..."     We need to
find a way to restoring that motivation and it starts by encouraging more
people to find ship blockers and rewarding them by fixing before we ship.
That might upset the timing and reliability of the release schedule but
something we've got to do if we are really interested in improving quality.


>
> Regardless of the rationale, adding variability and uncertainty into the
> train system works directly at odds with what it has been so successful at
> achieving -- not just for Firefox, but for Chrome and Rust, for example.
>

This is a really, really, good video.

https://air.mozilla.org/january-2016-brantina-ideals-over-ideology-building-software-with-the-end-in-mind-with-jocelyn-goldfein/

It challenges your idea that the release model for Rust is one that should
by definition be the one that should work for Firefox given its stage of
development and the users that its currently serving.  It sets up a
framework where we can talk about what release models might work best for
the set of users that software serves.

The first stage toward defining a good release model would begin by
developing some consensus around which of the quadrants each of our
products has now.  As we add products to quadrants to target different sets
of users it would allow us to use different release models with different
sets of timing and quality considerations.

Experimental products allow development teams to move fast and try lots of
experiments.  They get to target users that love to check out
innovation.    The bulk of users demand something much more stable and well
tested.  They leave if you force software on them that is not ready for
prime time if they have other choices.



> This isn't a small thing: giving credit where due, I see trains as the best
> thing Chrome ever did for the web. It's been one of the biggest drivers in
> pushing the platform forward. I would hate to see us regress in our
> contribution to that part of our mission.
>

I agree here, but would offer that lagged on one important goal.  We are
shipping software with too many regressions.

-chofmann


>
> Dave
>
> On Thu, Feb 4, 2016 at 12:50 PM, Lawrence Mandel <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > Four years ago Mozilla moved to a fixed-schedule release model, otherwise
> > known as the Train Model
> > <https://blog.mozilla.org/channels/2011/07/18/every-six-weeks/>, in
> which
> > we released Firefox every six weeks to get features and updates to users
> > faster and move at the speed of the Web. We studied the process carefully
> > and learned a lot. We have also identified additional areas for
> improvement
> > and it’s time we iterate again.
> >
> > We are moving to a variably scheduled six-to-eight week release cycle for
> > Firefox. With this new release cycle, we will deliver the same number of
> > releases per year but gain a few significant benefits over the previous
> six
> > week fixed model.
> >
> > For example, we will now be able to adjust release dates to respond to
> > emerging user and market needs and provide at least six working weeks for
> > every release. We also want to help support the well-being and
> > connectedness of our global Mozilla community by specifically allowing
> time
> > for holidays.
> >
> > You’ll find the 2016 Firefox release schedule listed below and in the
> > following Wiki <https://wiki.mozilla.org/RapidRelease/Calendar>.
> >
> >
> > This note has also been posted to the Future of Firefox blog
> > <
> >
> https://blog.mozilla.org/futurereleases/2016/02/04/update-on-2016-firefox-release-schedule
> > >
> > .
> >
> >
> > 2016 Firefox Release Schedule
> >
> > 2016-01-26 - Firefox 44
> >
> > 2016-03-08 - Firefox 45, ESR 45 (6 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-04-19 - Firefox 46 (6 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-06-07 - Firefox 47 (7 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-08-02 - Firefox 48 (8 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-09-13 - Firefox 49 (6 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-11-08 - Firefox 50 (8 weeks cycle)
> >
> > 2016-12-13 - Firefox 50.0.1 (5 week cycle, release for critical fixes as
> > needed)
> >
> > 2017-01-24 - Firefox 51 (6 weeks from prior release)
> >
> > Note: Firefox ESR will continue to ship point releases on the same day
> that
> > Firefox ships.
> >
> >
> > Lawrence
> > _______________________________________________
> > dev-planning mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
> >
> _______________________________________________
> dev-planning mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-planning
>
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Re: Update on 2016 Firefox Release Schedule

Cameron Kaiser-2
In reply to this post by Axel Hecht
On 2/5/16 5:08 AM, Sylvestre Ledru wrote:
>> Both in terms of what's trying to get into 50, and also what's
>> expected to get into 50.0.x?
> 50 will be just like any other release.
> 50.0.1 will be a security focus release.

Is the next ESR after 45 still going to be 52, or is it 51?

Cameron Kaiser

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