Scripting Mozilla applications

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Scripting Mozilla applications

Jamal Mazrui
I appreciate that, in general, Mozilla-based applications are intended
to be fully accessible with the default settings of a screen reader.
Until particular accessibility problems are resolved, however, custom
scripts can make a significant difference to the  friendliness and
acceptance of an application.  Scripting can also extend usability and
productivity beyond compliant accessibility (as do Mozilla extensions).


I know little about scripting on Linux or the Mac at this point, but do
know enough about the process with JAWS for Windows to make some
suggestions.  Such scripts usually need ways of isolating windows of
interest.  Currently, it appears that all Mozilla windows use the same
class name and no control ID.  Can such class names be differentiated?
If not, can unique control IDs be set for each control in a parent
window?

I realize this may be more difficult, but I also wonder whether any
mechanism can be incorporated by which assistive technology can at least
query, if not also manipulate, the application DOM.

Jamal

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Scripting Mozilla applications

T.V Raman

You can do pretty much most of what you want from JavaScript. The
connection between AT  such as screenreaders and the Firefox DOM
is a bit  more tenuous.

On Linux I use a Mozilla extension call mozrepl that allows me to
talk to a running firefox and execute arbitrary JavaScript
against the live DOM; you may want to try that on Windows.

Jamal Mazrui writes:
 > I appreciate that, in general, Mozilla-based applications are intended
 > to be fully accessible with the default settings of a screen reader.
 > Until particular accessibility problems are resolved, however, custom
 > scripts can make a significant difference to the  friendliness and
 > acceptance of an application.  Scripting can also extend usability and
 > productivity beyond compliant accessibility (as do Mozilla extensions).
 >
 >
 > I know little about scripting on Linux or the Mac at this point, but do
 > know enough about the process with JAWS for Windows to make some
 > suggestions.  Such scripts usually need ways of isolating windows of
 > interest.  Currently, it appears that all Mozilla windows use the same
 > class name and no control ID.  Can such class names be differentiated?
 > If not, can unique control IDs be set for each control in a parent
 > window?
 >
 > I realize this may be more difficult, but I also wonder whether any
 > mechanism can be incorporated by which assistive technology can at least
 > query, if not also manipulate, the application DOM.
 >
 > Jamal
 >
 > _______________________________________________
 > dev-accessibility mailing list
 > [hidden email]
 > https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility

--
Best Regards,
--raman

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Re: Scripting Mozilla applications

Aaron Leventhal-3
In reply to this post by Jamal Mazrui
Hi Jamal,

Screen readers will need to update themselves to allow scripting of
IAccessible2 applications. Using window class names won't help --
everything is basically windowless except for top level document or UI
containers. If Mozilla supported IDispatch that would at least help
script via the MSAA object tree and events, but wouldn't help provide
access to the IAccessible2 APIs. I don't recall why -- that's a question
for the IAccessible 2 list.

As Raman mentioned, using the Mozilla extension mechanism is a
possibility, although at present that won't help you with all apps
(perhaps you want to script Komodo for example).

The other thing is that most of these apps tend to be open source, and
in many cases we can fix a bug and benefit all assistive technologies
instead of one. If it's not really a bug and a matter of enhancing
access, we should still look to see if some of the power of IAccessible2
  or ARIA can be brought to bear (for example via the use of live
regions or accessible relations).

Providing IDispatch would at least give a start. Victor Tsaran asked for
that as well. Here's the bug for it in case you want to be CC'd:
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=166994

- Aaron



Jamal Mazrui wrote:

> I appreciate that, in general, Mozilla-based applications are intended
> to be fully accessible with the default settings of a screen reader.
> Until particular accessibility problems are resolved, however, custom
> scripts can make a significant difference to the  friendliness and
> acceptance of an application.  Scripting can also extend usability and
> productivity beyond compliant accessibility (as do Mozilla extensions).
>
>
> I know little about scripting on Linux or the Mac at this point, but do
> know enough about the process with JAWS for Windows to make some
> suggestions.  Such scripts usually need ways of isolating windows of
> interest.  Currently, it appears that all Mozilla windows use the same
> class name and no control ID.  Can such class names be differentiated?
> If not, can unique control IDs be set for each control in a parent
> window?
>
> I realize this may be more difficult, but I also wonder whether any
> mechanism can be incorporated by which assistive technology can at least
> query, if not also manipulate, the application DOM.
>
> Jamal
>
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