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Re:

Mark12547
In article <[hidden email]>,
[hidden email] says...
> Comcast says that you don't exist. Do you exist?
>

I have heard it speculated that we are in a digital simulation.
Consider, for example:

There appears to be a minimum distance, called "Planck Lenght", that is
the minimum theoretical distance that can be measured. It is reasonable
to say that the resolution of the universe is down to approximately
1.616229 x 10^-35 meters. Yes, that is quite a bit better resolution
than the 1920x1080 full HD screens one can buy today, but even so it
appears that the universe is quantized.

If the universe is quantized, though on a much higher resolution than we
can achieve with present technology, some physiscists have speculated
that we live in a digital simulation.

If we are really in a digital simulation, then either we are not real,
or our consciousnesses have been transferred to some computer that is
running this simulation.

Either that, or you will have to specify _what_ at Comcast is claiming
_what_ doesn't exist.
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Re:

Mike Easter-2
Mark12547 wrote:
> There appears to be a minimum distance, called "Planck Lenght", that is
> the minimum theoretical distance that can be measured.

John Baez, Joan's cousin (Joan's dad Albert, bigtime physics prof, was
John's uncle) is a prof of math at UC Riverside -- he writes a lot about
stuff related to such esoterica as Planck length.

When one tries to integrate phenomena of the very very big stuff,
gravity, black holes, etc with those of the very very small stuff, like
the tiniest distances or areas, one runs into all kinds of glitches.

We ordinary mortals who try to imagine/see things instead of just
grinding hairy unimaginable math around are asked to imagine this:

"if a particle or dot about 0.1 mm in size (which is approximately the
smallest the unaided human eye can see) were magnified in size to be as
large as the observable universe, then inside that universe-sized "dot",
the Planck length would be roughly the size of an actual 0.1 mm dot. In
other words, a 0.1 mm dot is halfway between the Planck length and the
size of the observable universe on a logarithmic scale."


Helpful math prof John Baez on Planck Length:
http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/planck/node2.html



--
Mike Easter
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Re:

Ron Hunter
On 3/14/2017 9:15 PM, Mike Easter wrote:

> Mark12547 wrote:
>> There appears to be a minimum distance, called "Planck Lenght", that is
>> the minimum theoretical distance that can be measured.
>
> John Baez, Joan's cousin (Joan's dad Albert, bigtime physics prof, was
> John's uncle) is a prof of math at UC Riverside -- he writes a lot about
> stuff related to such esoterica as Planck length.
>
> When one tries to integrate phenomena of the very very big stuff,
> gravity, black holes, etc with those of the very very small stuff, like
> the tiniest distances or areas, one runs into all kinds of glitches.
>
> We ordinary mortals who try to imagine/see things instead of just
> grinding hairy unimaginable math around are asked to imagine this:
>
> "if a particle or dot about 0.1 mm in size (which is approximately the
> smallest the unaided human eye can see) were magnified in size to be as
> large as the observable universe, then inside that universe-sized "dot",
> the Planck length would be roughly the size of an actual 0.1 mm dot. In
> other words, a 0.1 mm dot is halfway between the Planck length and the
> size of the observable universe on a logarithmic scale."
>
>
> Helpful math prof John Baez on Planck Length:
> http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/planck/node2.html
>
>
>
Now if there were just some kind of practical application for this type
of theoretical thinking...  Grin.

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Re:

Sailfish-4
My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on
3/14/2017 11:54 PM:
> On 3/14/2017 9:15 PM, Mike Easter wrote:
>>
>> Helpful math prof John Baez on Planck Length:
>> http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/planck/node2.html
>>
> Now if there were just some kind of practical application for this type
> of theoretical thinking...  Grin.
>
As a FanFic writer yourself, that should be obvious. It's relegation to
the esoteric and obscure to be used to great effect in SciFi novels,
more recently in the following, http://tinyurl.com/h5zbe68, as a means
to analogize humans to, at times, make great leaps of faith based on
little understood phenomenon.

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/z86x3sg
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Re:

Mike Easter-2
In reply to this post by Ron Hunter
Ron Hunter wrote:

> Mike Easter wrote:
>> Mark12547 wrote:
>>> There appears to be a minimum distance, called "Planck Lenght", that is
>>> the minimum theoretical distance that can be measured.
>>
>> Helpful math prof John Baez on Planck Length:
>>
> Now if there were just some kind of practical application for this type
> of theoretical thinking...  Grin.
>
Welll...

... those of us who are in favor of the progress of the metric system of
units may also favor the efforts to define (all or as many as possible)
those standards in some manner that does not require a physical
construct, such as has been the case for the kilogram mass unit for so
long.  That is, we need the kg based on some invariant universal
constants of nature instead of a man-made metal cylinder in a jar.

Planck had the same idea to a different end with his Planck units, which
for mass is a much more 'sensible' size than his length.  We also have
planck time and planck energy.

To me, I tend to think of things at Newtonian level rather than
relativistically, and it is usually easier for me to conceive of things
happening at the atomic level than anything smaller than that that
involves uncertainties.

We tend to see things from the perspective of the world we live in,
rather than the very large universe or the very small quanta.  When it
gets out of our grasping range we are just throwing math and statistics
at the visualization.

The Baez articles are somewhat helpful for me to bridge my gap between
Newton and Einstein on gravity and spacetime.

--
Mike Easter
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Re:

Ron Hunter
In reply to this post by Sailfish-4
On 3/15/2017 10:00 AM, Sailfish wrote:

> My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on
> 3/14/2017 11:54 PM:
>> On 3/14/2017 9:15 PM, Mike Easter wrote:
>>>
>>> Helpful math prof John Baez on Planck Length:
>>> http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/planck/node2.html
>>>
>> Now if there were just some kind of practical application for this
>> type of theoretical thinking...  Grin.
>>
> As a FanFic writer yourself, that should be obvious. It's relegation to
> the esoteric and obscure to be used to great effect in SciFi novels,
> more recently in the following, http://tinyurl.com/h5zbe68, as a means
> to analogize humans to, at times, make great leaps of faith based on
> little understood phenomenon.
>
That is what people with more technical knowledge, and more creativity
with such things are for.  I can write about things like that, but would
have to leave the details fuzzy, like how the Enterprise managed to
convert matter and anti-matter into energy, and derive propulsion from it.

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Creative SciFi

Sailfish-4
My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on
3/15/2017 12:40 PM:

> On 3/15/2017 10:00 AM, Sailfish wrote:
>> My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on
>> 3/14/2017 11:54 PM:
>>> On 3/14/2017 9:15 PM, Mike Easter wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Helpful math prof John Baez on Planck Length:
>>>> http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/planck/node2.html
>>>>
>>> Now if there were just some kind of practical application for this
>>> type of theoretical thinking...  Grin.
>>>
>> As a FanFic writer yourself, that should be obvious. It's relegation to
>> the esoteric and obscure to be used to great effect in SciFi novels,
>> more recently in the following, http://tinyurl.com/h5zbe68, as a means
>> to analogize humans to, at times, make great leaps of faith based on
>> little understood phenomenon.
>>
> That is what people with more technical knowledge, and more creativity
> with such things are for.  I can write about things like that, but would
> have to leave the details fuzzy, like how the Enterprise managed to
> convert matter and anti-matter into energy, and derive propulsion from it.
>
heh, and lest we forget, the pillars that most space opera novels are
built on (FTL technology, aka slip space, aka slip stream, &c) and
accurate laser weapon guidance and targeting on ships a few light
minutes away :-)

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/z86x3sg
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