Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

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Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Sailfish-4
REF: https://www.theregister.com/2020/06/04/firefox_77_security_fixes/

[excerpt quote=\"
Of the five high-risk flaws, three are confirmed to allow arbitrary code
execution, which in the case of a web browser means that simply loading
up a malicious page could lead to malware running on your machine. As it
turns out, all three of the code execution bugs were found in-house by
Mozilla developers, rather than miscreants exploiting them in the wild,
which is good news.
\" /]
Hmm, sounds like someone jumped the gun to have missed 5 critical flaws
discovered just after the reaease.

--
Sailfish
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Ken Springer
On 6/3/20 11:17 PM, Sailfish wrote:

> REF: https://www.theregister.com/2020/06/04/firefox_77_security_fixes/
>
> [excerpt quote=\"
> Of the five high-risk flaws, three are confirmed to allow arbitrary code
> execution, which in the case of a web browser means that simply loading
> up a malicious page could lead to malware running on your machine. As it
> turns out, all three of the code execution bugs were found in-house by
> Mozilla developers, rather than miscreants exploiting them in the wild,
> which is good news.
> \" /]
> Hmm, sounds like someone jumped the gun to have missed 5 critical flaws
> discovered just after the reaease.

Taking pride in the quality of their work seems to have disappeared.  A
somewhat universal trait in all industries these days.  :-(


--
Ken
MacOS 10.14.6
Firefox 73.0.1
Thunderbird 60.9.1
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
      and it's gone!"
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Wolf K.
On 2020-06-04 05:39, Ken Springer wrote:

> On 6/3/20 11:17 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>> REF: https://www.theregister.com/2020/06/04/firefox_77_security_fixes/
>>
>> [excerpt quote=\"
>> Of the five high-risk flaws, three are confirmed to allow arbitrary code
>> execution, which in the case of a web browser means that simply loading
>> up a malicious page could lead to malware running on your machine. As it
>> turns out, all three of the code execution bugs were found in-house by
>> Mozilla developers, rather than miscreants exploiting them in the wild,
>> which is good news.
>> \" /]
>> Hmm, sounds like someone jumped the gun to have missed 5 critical flaws
>> discovered just after the reaease.
>
> Taking pride in the quality of their work seems to have disappeared.  A
> somewhat universal trait in all industries these days.  :-(
>
>

First thing UI learned about programming, way back when a 16KB program
was considered "large", was that any program powerful enough to do some
real-world work will do things you didn't anticipate. I've forgotten
just about everything I learned about coding, but this principle has stuck.

Best,

--
Wolf K
kirkwood40.blogspot.com
The universe is cleverer than we are. (Krauss)
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Mayayana
"Wolf K" <[hidden email]> wrote

| >> Hmm, sounds like someone jumped the gun to have missed 5 critical flaws
| >> discovered just after the reaease.
| >
| > Taking pride in the quality of their work seems to have disappeared. A
| > somewhat universal trait in all industries these days. :-(
| >
| First thing UI learned about programming, way back when a 16KB program
| was considered "large", was that any program powerful enough to do some
| real-world work will do things you didn't anticipate. I've forgotten
| just about everything I learned about coding, but this principle has
stuck.
|

  Yes, and I think there's a second maxim:

"If you release any old thing every 10 days without
hesitating to ignore customers and backward compatibility,
then you'll end up with a bloated mess. Which is OK.
Just be sure not to fix too many bugs because you
want to have an excuse to release version 243 in
another 10 days."

  Or as Zuck says, "Move fast. Break things."

  This is one of the problems with OSS. The "cause"
becomes the whole point. The actual product is a
side effect. Like WINE, which managed to never quite
work over 20 years of releases every 10 days.

  But to be fair, no one can be expected to make a
hack-proof browser with javascript allowed. It's
not safe. Never was. Never will be. Keeping up to
date with patches runs a far second place to
disabling script for people who care about security.
Or if you do want to enable script, do it on an
unimportant machine, not a machine you do work
on or keep sensitive files on.

  I still run FF52 and New Moon 28.6. I'm not
worried. NM has script disabled. FF uses NoScript.
For heavily interactive websites that I must use, I
generally use a different computer. Not only am I safe
without updates. I also get to keep my extensions
that work well... I'm not forced to use tabs...



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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Sailfish-4
My bloviated meandering follows what Mayayana graced us with on 6/4/2020
6:21 AM:

> "Wolf K" <[hidden email]> wrote
>
> | >> Hmm, sounds like someone jumped the gun to have missed 5 critical flaws
> | >> discovered just after the reaease.
> | >
> | > Taking pride in the quality of their work seems to have disappeared. A
> | > somewhat universal trait in all industries these days. :-(
> | >
> | First thing UI learned about programming, way back when a 16KB program
> | was considered "large", was that any program powerful enough to do some
> | real-world work will do things you didn't anticipate. I've forgotten
> | just about everything I learned about coding, but this principle has
> stuck.
> |
>
>   Yes, and I think there's a second maxim:
>
> "If you release any old thing every 10 days without
> hesitating to ignore customers and backward compatibility,
> then you'll end up with a bloated mess. Which is OK.
> Just be sure not to fix too many bugs because you
> want to have an excuse to release version 243 in
> another 10 days."

Perhaps Mozilla decided to opt for the herd immunity virus approach? :-)

--
Sailfish
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Mayayana
In reply to this post by Mayayana
"TCW" <.@.> wrote

| But the one I always remember best:
|
| The only system which is truly secure is one which is switched off and
| unplugged locked in a titanium lined safe, buried in a concrete
| bunker, and is surrounded by nerve gas and very highly paid armed
| guards. Even then, I wouldn't stake my life on it.
|

   The problem with that one is that lazy people use it
to justify laziness. It's ostrich logic. "Hey, if I worry
about things like that then I'll never enjoy anything."

  For anyone slightly handy, much better security is not
hard. Virtually all online hacks require script. Many require
that you allow script from ad servers. I rarely allow script,
yet most of the websites I visit work just fine. Some work
even better. And they all load almost instantly.

  Offline is similar. It's not hard to avoid paying for gas
or groceries with a credit card or buying coffee with a
debit card.

   We're gradually dealing with a transformed situation,
where people think it's normal to require a text message
on a cellphone in order to make a credit card purchase or
access their email. How long before you can't use a credit
card unless you have a cellphone with you and agree to
answer text messages with every purchase? Yet the same
people who think that's normal also think online security
is the stuff of tinfoil hats.


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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Sailfish-4
My bloviated meandering follows what Mayayana graced us with on 6/5/2020
6:16 AM:

>
>   Offline is similar. It's not hard to avoid paying for gas
> or groceries with a credit card or buying coffee with a
> debit card.
>
>    We're gradually dealing with a transformed situation,
> where people think it's normal to require a text message
> on a cellphone in order to make a credit card purchase or
> access their email. How long before you can't use a credit
> card unless you have a cellphone with you and agree to
> answer text messages with every purchase? Yet the same
> people who think that's normal also think online security
> is the stuff of tinfoil hats.
>
I agree. I only use my cell phone for maps and emergency phone calls
when I'm on a trip; otherwise, the unit is turned off. My goto phone is
VoIP cordless home phone.

The internet titans are doing everything they can to eliminate the
credit card and cash (now they're scaring the simple-minded to avoid
cash due to the likelihood of covid through contact HAHA, fat chance.

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/z86x3sg
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Mayayana
"Sailfish" <[hidden email]> wrote

| I agree. I only use my cell phone for maps and emergency phone calls
| when I'm on a trip; otherwise, the unit is turned off. My goto phone is
| VoIP cordless home phone.
|

   I have similar. A Tracphone that costs $20 every
3 months. The only problem is that I probably make
about 6 1-minute calls per year, so I've had to pay
for thousands of minutes I don't need. :)

| The internet titans are doing everything they can to eliminate the
| credit card and cash (now they're scaring the simple-minded to avoid
| cash due to the likelihood of covid through contact HAHA, fat chance.
|
  I've noticed that. Here it's illegal to require a non-cash
payment, but some stores, like nurseries, have been
setting that requirement. I wanted petunias for my window
boxes. I wasn't going to argue with them. But as of this
week, racism has replaced coronavirus and MeToo as The
Only Thing That Matters, so hopefully that anti-cash
trend won't get traction.


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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Wolf K.
In reply to this post by Mayayana
On 2020-06-05 09:16, Mayayana wrote:

> "TCW" <.@.> wrote
>
> | But the one I always remember best:
> |
> | The only system which is truly secure is one which is switched off and
> | unplugged locked in a titanium lined safe, buried in a concrete
> | bunker, and is surrounded by nerve gas and very highly paid armed
> | guards. Even then, I wouldn't stake my life on it.
> |
>
>     The problem with that one is that lazy people use it
> to justify laziness. It's ostrich logic. "Hey, if I worry
> about things like that then I'll never enjoy anything."
>
>    For anyone slightly handy, much better security is not
> hard. Virtually all online hacks require script. Many require
> that you allow script from ad servers. I rarely allow script,
> yet most of the websites I visit work just fine. Some work
> even better. And they all load almost instantly.
>
>    Offline is similar. It's not hard to avoid paying for gas
> or groceries with a credit card or buying coffee with a
> debit card.
>
>     We're gradually dealing with a transformed situation,
> where people think it's normal to require a text message
> on a cellphone in order to make a credit card purchase or
> access their email. How long before you can't use a credit
> card unless you have a cellphone with you and agree to
> answer text messages with every purchase? Yet the same
> people who think that's normal also think online security
> is the stuff of tinfoil hats.

And the same people they worry about covid-19 contact tracing apps.
Afraid the gummint will misuse their personal data, while oblivious to
the misuses of their personal data by private business.

--
Wolf K
kirkwood40.blogspot.com
The universe is cleverer than we are. (Krauss)
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Mayayana
"Wolf K" <[hidden email]> wrote

| And the same people they worry about covid-19 contact tracing apps.
| Afraid the gummint will misuse their personal data, while oblivious to
| the misuses of their personal data by private business.
|

  That's an interesting case. There have been some
notable statistics, such as where New Yorkers have
fled to or who went to Florida to flaunt coronavirus
restrictions. All based on tracking peoples' phones.
Yet no one seems to notice.

  The one I really got a kick out of was in California
where they're tracking peoples' phones but reassured
the public that the data is only coming from data-mining
spyware apps used by advertisers, and not from the
phone companies. :)


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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Wolf K.
On 2020-06-06 12:10, Mayayana wrote:

> "Wolf K" <[hidden email]> wrote
>
> | And the same people they worry about covid-19 contact tracing apps.
> | Afraid the gummint will misuse their personal data, while oblivious to
> | the misuses of their personal data by private business.
> |
>
>    That's an interesting case. There have been some
> notable statistics, such as where New Yorkers have
> fled to or who went to Florida to flaunt coronavirus
> restrictions. All based on tracking peoples' phones.
> Yet no one seems to notice.
>
>    The one I really got a kick out of was in California
> where they're tracking peoples' phones but reassured
> the public that the data is only coming from data-mining
> spyware apps used by advertisers, and not from the
> phone companies. :)
>
>


Recently, while browsing YouTube, a "Recommended for you" selection
showed up based on a recent web search, _not_ on past YouTube
selections. Creepy.

--
Wolf K
kirkwood40.blogspot.com
The universe is cleverer than we are. (Krauss)
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

C. St-Luke
On 06-Jun-2020 1:14 PM, Wolf K wrote:

> On 2020-06-06 12:10, Mayayana wrote:
>> "Wolf K" <[hidden email]> wrote
>>
>> | And the same people they worry about covid-19 contact tracing apps.
>> | Afraid the gummint will misuse their personal data, while oblivious to
>> | the misuses of their personal data by private business.
>> |
>>
>>    That's an interesting case. There have been some
>> notable statistics, such as where New Yorkers have
>> fled to or who went to Florida to flaunt coronavirus
>> restrictions. All based on tracking peoples' phones.
>> Yet no one seems to notice.
>>
>>    The one I really got a kick out of was in California
>> where they're tracking peoples' phones but reassured
>> the public that the data is only coming from data-mining
>> spyware apps used by advertisers, and not from the
>> phone companies. :)
>>
>>
>
>
> Recently, while browsing YouTube, a "Recommended for you" selection
> showed up based on a recent web search, _not_ on past YouTube
> selections. Creepy.
>

Yes creepy.
In Tools/Options/General/Browsing, I have everything unchecked so no
recommendation for me.
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Sailfish-4
In reply to this post by Mayayana
My bloviated meandering follows what Mayayana graced us with on 6/6/2020
4:48 AM:

> "Sailfish" <[hidden email]> wrote
>
> | I agree. I only use my cell phone for maps and emergency phone calls
> | when I'm on a trip; otherwise, the unit is turned off. My goto phone is
> | VoIP cordless home phone.
>
>    I have similar. A Tracphone that costs $20 every
> 3 months. The only problem is that I probably make
> about 6 1-minute calls per year, so I've had to pay
> for thousands of minutes I don't need. :)
>
Like minds. I get the yearly plan and had it for so long that I
accumulated over 15000 texts, 15000 minutes and over 15GB data. Knowing
that I'd never use it, I wiped it clean of all personal information and
gifted to one of my grandkids. he's already whittled the data down to
under 7GB! Mostly he uses it for youtube on trips and some gaming.

I got myself a newer, under $100 Samsung and am starting anew.

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/z86x3sg
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Sailfish-4
In reply to this post by Wolf K.
My bloviated meandering follows what Wolf K graced us with on 6/6/2020
6:38 AM:
>
> And the same people they worry about covid-19 contact tracing apps.
> Afraid the gummint will misuse their personal data, while oblivious to
> the misuses of their personal data by private business.
>
It's almost like they don't know or don't care that Apple&Google insure
you are logged into their site in order to use the phone. Then, they
slurp up all your contact numbers and match them with others contact
lists to make the connections of who you know. Then, almost every app
you install requires you give them complete permissions of things like
the camera, your microphone and, oh yes, your contact list in order to
use it.

Truly amazing ... and not in a good way.

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/z86x3sg
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Sailfish-4
In reply to this post by Wolf K.
My bloviated meandering follows what Wolf K graced us with on 6/6/2020
10:14 AM:

> On 2020-06-06 12:10, Mayayana wrote:
>> "Wolf K" <[hidden email]> wrote
>>
>> | And the same people they worry about covid-19 contact tracing apps.
>> | Afraid the gummint will misuse their personal data, while oblivious to
>> | the misuses of their personal data by private business.
>> |
>>
>>    That's an interesting case. There have been some
>> notable statistics, such as where New Yorkers have
>> fled to or who went to Florida to flaunt coronavirus
>> restrictions. All based on tracking peoples' phones.
>> Yet no one seems to notice.
>>
>>    The one I really got a kick out of was in California
>> where they're tracking peoples' phones but reassured
>> the public that the data is only coming from data-mining
>> spyware apps used by advertisers, and not from the
>> phone companies. :)
>
> Recently, while browsing YouTube, a "Recommended for you" selection
> showed up based on a recent web search, _not_ on past YouTube
> selections. Creepy.
>
Yep, I'm also amazed at some of the ads on Facebook are directed toward
me based on stuff I've purchased on Amazon and Audible, even though I
use a completely different email addy between the two.

Creepy, it is.

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/z86x3sg
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Mayayana
In reply to this post by Sailfish-4
"Sailfish" <[hidden email]> wrote

| It's almost like they don't know or don't care that Apple&Google insure
| you are logged into their site in order to use the phone. Then, they
| slurp up all your contact numbers and match them with others contact
| lists to make the connections of who you know. Then, almost every app
| you install requires you give them complete permissions of things like
| the camera, your microphone and, oh yes, your contact list in order to
| use it.
|
| Truly amazing ... and not in a good way.
|

  It's likely to get worse. I find people are increasingly
surprised, sometimes annoyed, that I don't have texting.
They used to expect people to answer calls 24/7. Now
they expect people to answer texts. It's become a way
of life. I suspect that most young people would begin to
panic without their phones for constant scanning of
acquaintances. Most of them no longer inhabit physical
space fully. They're vaguely aware of where their bodies
are, but mostly tuned into social media.

   Restaurants starting to open are now talking about
"encouraging contactless payment" and downloading
menus to cellphones. Can you go to those restaurants
without a cellphone? Probably most people would now
ask, "Why would you want to?!"

  There may end up being a whole
new category of datamining companies who buy that
data: You ate with x, y and z at Thai Garden, on June 6.
You use a crappy Samsung phone, so you're probably
a tech hayseed who doesn't even have Alexa at home.
You ordered the Red Curry. Here's your list of installed
apps.... Here's what you talked about, as reported by
various apps that enabled the microphone.... They can
then sell that data on to the companies such as the ones
California is claiming to pay, to hand over your tracking
collar record. The only way you'll know will be indirectly,
when you read a newspaper article saying that there's an
unusually low rate of coronavirus among people who like
red curry. "How do they know tha.....!"


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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

J. P. Gilliver (John)-3
In reply to this post by Sailfish-4
On Sun, 7 Jun 2020 at 21:42:47, Sailfish
<[hidden email]> wrote:

>My bloviated meandering follows what Mayayana graced us with on
>6/6/2020 4:48 AM:
>> "Sailfish" <[hidden email]> wrote
>>
>> | I agree. I only use my cell phone for maps and emergency phone
>> |calls
>> | when I'm on a trip; otherwise, the unit is turned off. My goto phone is
>> | VoIP cordless home phone.
>>     I have similar. A Tracphone that costs $20 every
>> 3 months. The only problem is that I probably make
>> about 6 1-minute calls per year, so I've had to pay
>> for thousands of minutes I don't need. :)
>>
>Like minds. I get the yearly plan and had it for so long that I
>accumulated over 15000 texts, 15000 minutes and over 15GB data. Knowing
>that I'd never use it, I wiped it clean of all personal information and
>gifted to one of my grandkids. he's already whittled the data down to
>under 7GB! Mostly he uses it for youtube on trips and some gaming.
>
>I got myself a newer, under $100 Samsung and am starting anew.
>
I presume you don't have true PAYG in your country. I bought a PAYG SIM
a few years ago, and put ten pounds on it; last time I checked, there
was still over 7 pounds left. (I do have to make a call every few
months, but that's more technical - to stop the number being deactivated
- than contractual.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)Ar@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

She didn't strike me as much of a reader. It's never a good sign if someone
has a leaflet with a bookmark in it. - Sarah Millican in Rdio Times, 17-23
November 2012
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Daniel-3
In reply to this post by Mayayana
Mayayana wrote on 8/06/2020 10:38 PM:

> "Sailfish" <[hidden email]> wrote
>
> | It's almost like they don't know or don't care that Apple&Google insure
> | you are logged into their site in order to use the phone. Then, they
> | slurp up all your contact numbers and match them with others contact
> | lists to make the connections of who you know. Then, almost every app
> | you install requires you give them complete permissions of things like
> | the camera, your microphone and, oh yes, your contact list in order to
> | use it.
> |
> | Truly amazing ... and not in a good way.
> |
>
>    It's likely to get worse. I find people are increasingly
> surprised, sometimes annoyed, that I don't have texting.
> They used to expect people to answer calls 24/7. Now
> they expect people to answer texts. It's become a way
> of life. I suspect that most young people would begin to
> panic without their phones for constant scanning of
> acquaintances. Most of them no longer inhabit physical
> space fully. They're vaguely aware of where their bodies
> are, but mostly tuned into social media.

And they, often, take their 'phones to bed with them!! Got to be in
instant contact. ..... and 'they' wonder why so many people are getting
Cyber-bullied!!

>     Restaurants starting to open are now talking about
> "encouraging contactless payment" and downloading
> menus to cellphones. Can you go to those restaurants
> without a cellphone? Probably most people would now
> ask, "Why would you want to?!"

When things opened up a bit more last week, my sister and I had a "Sit
Down lunch" at a local Hotel. I was wondering what 'phone number I'd
have to ring when the Waitress placed Menus on the table and said she'd
be back shortly for our order!

>    There may end up being a whole
> new category of datamining companies who buy that
> data: You ate with x, y and z at Thai Garden, on June 6.

Owww! Thai!! Haven't had that in sooooo long!!

> You use a crappy Samsung phone, so you're probably

How did YOU know I had a Samsung?? Have YOU been spying on me or something??

> a tech hayseed who doesn't even have Alexa at home.

Who's Alexa?? What does she charge?? ;-P

--
Daniel

Win7 User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:52.0)
Gecko/20100101 SeaMonkey/2.49.5 Build identifier: 20190609032134

Linux User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:52.0)
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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Mayayana
"Daniel" <[hidden email]> wrote

| >     Restaurants starting to open are now talking about
| > "encouraging contactless payment" and downloading
| > menus to cellphones. Can you go to those restaurants
| > without a cellphone? Probably most people would now
| > ask, "Why would you want to?!"
|
| When things opened up a bit more last week, my sister and I had a "Sit
| Down lunch" at a local Hotel. I was wondering what 'phone number I'd
| have to ring when the Waitress placed Menus on the table and said she'd
| be back shortly for our order!
|

  That's reassuring. I don't think they're being allowed
in many states. But no one says, "No phone, no service".
They say customers "will be able to" get menus on
their phones. Bu maybe there will be options, like walking
over to the menu in the entryway and taking notes... so
long as you stay 6' from the line of people blocking
the entry. :)


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Re: Mozilla just patched three hijack-me holes and a bunch of other flaws

Sailfish-4
In reply to this post by J. P. Gilliver (John)-3
My bloviated meandering follows what J. P. Gilliver (John) graced us
with on 6/8/2020 12:26 PM:
> On Sun, 7 Jun 2020 at 21:42:47, Sailfish
> <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I presume you don't have true PAYG in your country. I bought a PAYG SIM
> a few years ago, and put ten pounds on it; last time I checked, there
> was still over 7 pounds left. (I do have to make a call every few
> months, but that's more technical - to stop the number being deactivated
> - than contractual.)

Interesting, it's the first I've heard of it. Is that primarily a UK
service?

While I don't do "text", I do rely on data while traveling since I use
Google Maps for GPS directions. Google Maps does allow me to download
destination maps beforehand using my WIFI, which I do if I can remember,
but I would want a minimum data allocation for those cases where I
needed to get un-preloaded map data.

--
Sailfish
Rare Mozilla Stuff: http://tinyurl.com/z86x3sg
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