Java support in Firefox

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Java support in Firefox

Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism
I do not know if this is off topic for this list. If it is please forgive
me. I am not sure who to ask. I am finding Firefox's Java support to be
weak. Internet Explorer seems to work much better with web pages that use
alot of Java (ie web stock pages) and /or webpages with a ".asp" extension.
Is this a known problem and can be fixed?

----
Angus MacKinnon
MacKinnon Crest Saying
Latin -  Audentes Fortuna Juvat
English - Fortune Assists The Daring
Web page http://www.infoforce-services.com
Choroideremia Research Foundation Inc. 2nd Vice president
http://www.choroideremia.org

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Re: Java support in Firefox

Aaron Leventhal-3
Java applet accessibility in Firefox is indeed weak.  Believe it or not,
you're the first person to ask about it. I agree it should be fixed,
although at the moment I'm not sure what we need to do, or who should do it.

As far as .ASP or other technologies related to serving web pages, that
is not a problem for Firefox. ASP is just used like PHP -- to
dynamically serve up different HTML depending on the current user's
situation. Perhaps the ASP pages you're visiting have some other issues.

- Aaron

Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism wrote:

> I do not know if this is off topic for this list. If it is please
> forgive me. I am not sure who to ask. I am finding Firefox's Java
> support to be weak. Internet Explorer seems to work much better with web
> pages that use alot of Java (ie web stock pages) and /or webpages with a
> ".asp" extension. Is this a known problem and can be fixed?
>
> ----
> Angus MacKinnon
> MacKinnon Crest Saying
> Latin -  Audentes Fortuna Juvat
> English - Fortune Assists The Daring
> Web page http://www.infoforce-services.com
> Choroideremia Research Foundation Inc. 2nd Vice president
> http://www.choroideremia.org
>
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RE: Java support in Firefox

Sina Bahram
Is it possible to expose any of the java accessibility api information in an
applet context in firefox?

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Aaron
Leventhal
Sent: Tuesday, June 27, 2006 8:52 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Java support in Firefox

Java applet accessibility in Firefox is indeed weak.  Believe it or not,
you're the first person to ask about it. I agree it should be fixed,
although at the moment I'm not sure what we need to do, or who should do it.

As far as .ASP or other technologies related to serving web pages, that is
not a problem for Firefox. ASP is just used like PHP -- to dynamically serve
up different HTML depending on the current user's situation. Perhaps the ASP
pages you're visiting have some other issues.

- Aaron

Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism wrote:

> I do not know if this is off topic for this list. If it is please
> forgive me. I am not sure who to ask. I am finding Firefox's Java
> support to be weak. Internet Explorer seems to work much better with
> web pages that use alot of Java (ie web stock pages) and /or webpages
> with a ".asp" extension. Is this a known problem and can be fixed?
>
> ----
> Angus MacKinnon
> MacKinnon Crest Saying
> Latin -  Audentes Fortuna Juvat
> English - Fortune Assists The Daring
> Web page http://www.infoforce-services.com Choroideremia Research
> Foundation Inc. 2nd Vice president http://www.choroideremia.org
>
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RE: Java support in Firefox

jsp (Bugzilla)
In reply to this post by Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism
Among the possible "other issues:" many ASP pages rely on scripting.
Since Internet Explorer's scripting language (JScript) is not identical
to Mozilla's (JavaScript), and Microsoft's Web development tools (which
are used to develop many ASP pages) target IE but not necessarily other
browsers, it's quite possible that a higher percentage of ASP pages have
poor cross-browser support than other pages.  Even in cases where they
claim their tools produce pages that will work across browsers, they
often don't work well with Mozilla-based browsers.  I don't know whether
to attribute this to incompetence, disingenuousness ("hey, it works with
IE 5.5 and IE 6; that's cross-browser!"), or something else.

-----Original Message-----
From: [hidden email]
[mailto:[hidden email]] On Behalf Of Aaron
Leventhal
Sent: Tuesday, June 27, 2006 8:52 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: Java support in Firefox

Java applet accessibility in Firefox is indeed weak.  Believe it or not,

you're the first person to ask about it. I agree it should be fixed,
although at the moment I'm not sure what we need to do, or who should do
it.

As far as .ASP or other technologies related to serving web pages, that
is not a problem for Firefox. ASP is just used like PHP -- to
dynamically serve up different HTML depending on the current user's
situation. Perhaps the ASP pages you're visiting have some other issues.

- Aaron

Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism wrote:
> I do not know if this is off topic for this list. If it is please
> forgive me. I am not sure who to ask. I am finding Firefox's Java
> support to be weak. Internet Explorer seems to work much better with
web
> pages that use alot of Java (ie web stock pages) and /or webpages with
a

> ".asp" extension. Is this a known problem and can be fixed?
>
> ----
> Angus MacKinnon
> MacKinnon Crest Saying
> Latin -  Audentes Fortuna Juvat
> English - Fortune Assists The Daring
> Web page http://www.infoforce-services.com
> Choroideremia Research Foundation Inc. 2nd Vice president
> http://www.choroideremia.org
>
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Re: Java support in Firefox

Shane Anderson
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
Hi all

Java applet accessibility has always had problems from the beginning. I
haven't looked into how accessible applets are lately but it now seems to be
less of an issue as developers have gone toward newer technologies such as
flash and Ajax. WebAIM did some research several years ago on java
accessibility and here is what we found:

1. If you followed standard markup (W3C HTML or XHTML), Java applets could
not be invoked properly across all browsers. IE and I think Opera had
different ways of calling an applet into play. IE seemed to like to run
applets by default using their version based off Java version 1.1 (which
used AWT gui and was completely inaccessible).

2. Some assistive technologies required the Java "access bridge". It has
been only a couple of years since the access bridge worked correctly, it was
awful to implement, and I notice on the java access list that users still
have many problems with it.

3. Once you got the planets in alignment then you have to deal with the very
different rendering quality of the different browsers.

There are still a few Java applets out there but I still would not use them
in public pages (except maybe for a game or to fulfill some very specialize
need). Institutions like our university use large Oracle java applications
but these applications are internal and a browser becomes a part of the
application. Applets become much more accessible when they are the only
thing on the page.

There is still the problem of figuring out how to write accessible java
applets. Most of the documentation is outdated on the Sun site and IBM site.
IBM has the best documentation but when I looked around earlier this week it
I noticed it was not getting a lot of attention. Sun offers a set of tools
for testing java accessibility but good luck finding it.

Ok I will end my eulogy for Java on the web. Basically I would vote Java
applet accessibility as a low priority for Mozilla and suggest developers
find other solutions.

Shane Anderson
WebAIM.org


On 6/27/06, Aaron Leventhal <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Java applet accessibility in Firefox is indeed weak.  Believe it or not,
> you're the first person to ask about it. I agree it should be fixed,
> although at the moment I'm not sure what we need to do, or who should do
> it.
>
> As far as .ASP or other technologies related to serving web pages, that
> is not a problem for Firefox. ASP is just used like PHP -- to
> dynamically serve up different HTML depending on the current user's
> situation. Perhaps the ASP pages you're visiting have some other issues.
>
> - Aaron
>
> Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism wrote:
> > I do not know if this is off topic for this list. If it is please
> > forgive me. I am not sure who to ask. I am finding Firefox's Java
> > support to be weak. Internet Explorer seems to work much better with web
> > pages that use alot of Java (ie web stock pages) and /or webpages with a
> > ".asp" extension. Is this a known problem and can be fixed?
> >
> > ----
> > Angus MacKinnon
> > MacKinnon Crest Saying
> > Latin -  Audentes Fortuna Juvat
> > English - Fortune Assists The Daring
> > Web page http://www.infoforce-services.com
> > Choroideremia Research Foundation Inc. 2nd Vice president
> > http://www.choroideremia.org
> >
> _______________________________________________
> dev-accessibility mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility
>
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Re: Java support in Firefox

Norman Robinson
Shane,

Were you referencing the <OBJECT> tag that was
previously required for IE and Windows? That is old
and depreciated as far as I know; Java works with the
<APPLET> tag. (I.e.,
http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/guide/plugin/developer_guide/applet_tag.html)

Two sample programs that are packaged with the Java
Access Bridge: Java Monkey and Java Ferret. These
programs attach themselves to any Java programs that
run in the same JVM, and use a number of Java Access
Bridge features.
http://java.sun.com/products/jfc/accessibility/index.jsp

The address accessibility in some of their tutorials:
http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/uiswing/misc/access.html
http://java.sun.com/developer/JDCTechTips/2005/tt0518.html#1

While "some users have had problems" is true (I'm one
of them) most of the issues boil down to developers
using the built-in MS JVM versus a specific install of
Sun's JVM. The Java Access Bridge has greatly
improved. And, the access bridge is only for MS
Windows - it provides the glue between Java and the MS
Accessibility API (MSAA).

Sorry for my ignorance, but could you explain the
difference between a "Java Application" and use of a
Java applet from a conceptual view? I thought the
accessibility issues were the same, both call the JVM,
both require the developer to design in the
accessibility calls and information.

I haven't seen a succinct list of the current
technical issues with Firefox. From my perspective at
a government agency, I would like to share that I
would hate to not be able to use Firefox as an agency
standard simply because it doesn't support use with
the many Java applications we have today. Just my two
cents.

Regards,

Norman B. Robinson

--- Shane Anderson <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi all
>
> Java applet accessibility has always had problems
> from the beginning. I
> haven't looked into how accessible applets are
> lately but it now seems to be
> less of an issue as developers have gone toward
> newer technologies such as
> flash and Ajax. WebAIM did some research several
> years ago on java
> accessibility and here is what we found:
>
> 1. If you followed standard markup (W3C HTML or
> XHTML), Java applets could
> not be invoked properly across all browsers. IE and
> I think Opera had
> different ways of calling an applet into play. IE
> seemed to like to run
> applets by default using their version based off
> Java version 1.1 (which
> used AWT gui and was completely inaccessible).
>
> 2. Some assistive technologies required the Java
> "access bridge". It has
> been only a couple of years since the access bridge
> worked correctly, it was
> awful to implement, and I notice on the java access
> list that users still
> have many problems with it.
>
> 3. Once you got the planets in alignment then you
> have to deal with the very
> different rendering quality of the different
> browsers.
>
> There are still a few Java applets out there but I
> still would not use them
> in public pages (except maybe for a game or to
> fulfill some very specialize
> need). Institutions like our university use large
> Oracle java applications
> but these applications are internal and a browser
> becomes a part of the
> application. Applets become much more accessible
> when they are the only
> thing on the page.
>
> There is still the problem of figuring out how to
> write accessible java
> applets. Most of the documentation is outdated on
> the Sun site and IBM site.
> IBM has the best documentation but when I looked
> around earlier this week it
> I noticed it was not getting a lot of attention. Sun
> offers a set of tools
> for testing java accessibility but good luck finding
> it.
>
> Ok I will end my eulogy for Java on the web.
> Basically I would vote Java
> applet accessibility as a low priority for Mozilla
> and suggest developers
> find other solutions.
>
> Shane Anderson
> WebAIM.org
>

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Re: Java support in Firefox

Aaron Leventhal-3
In reply to this post by Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism
Norman Robinson wrote:
>  From my perspective at
> a government agency, I would like to share that I
> would hate to not be able to use Firefox as an agency
> standard simply because it doesn't support use with
> the many Java applications we have today. Just my two
> cents.

We'll look into it for Firefox 3. In the mean time, any technical
knowledge anyone care share about how to get it done would be great. I
believe it involves use of the Java Access Bridge?

- Aaron
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Re: Java support in Firefox

Shane Anderson
In reply to this post by Norman Robinson
On 6/27/06, Norman Robinson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Were you referencing the <OBJECT> tag that was
> previously required for IE and Windows? That is old
> and depreciated as far as I know; Java works with the
> <APPLET> tag. (I.e.,
>
> http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/guide/plugin/developer_guide/applet_tag.html
> )


Actually it is the <applet> tag that was deprecated in HTML 4.01. The
<object> tag used in a standards compliant form invokes the MSJVM (if
installed) on IE. If standards compliance is an issue then the <applet> tag
is not an option and the <object> tag does not work properly. At the time we
found that the <applet> tag provided the most consistent results across
browsers.

Two sample programs that are packaged with the Java
> Access Bridge: Java Monkey and Java Ferret. These
> programs attach themselves to any Java programs that
> run in the same JVM, and use a number of Java Access
> Bridge features.
> http://java.sun.com/products/jfc/accessibility/index.jsp


Ah yes, Java Monkey and Java Ferret, those are the tools I was thinking of.
Previously they were not bundled and every time I looked for them it took me
10-15 minutes.

The address accessibility in some of their tutorials:

> http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/uiswing/misc/access.html
> http://java.sun.com/developer/JDCTechTips/2005/tt0518.html#1
>
> While "some users have had problems" is true (I'm one
> of them) most of the issues boil down to developers
> using the built-in MS JVM versus a specific install of
> Sun's JVM. The Java Access Bridge has greatly
> improved. And, the access bridge is only for MS
> Windows - it provides the glue between Java and the MS
> Accessibility API (MSAA).


Right. And since most screen reader users use windows based software, the
Java Access Bridge is a necessity for the few people who know it exists to
access the perhaps dozen or so accessible applets that exist in the vast
universe of the internet. :)

Can you sense my frustration? Its not with you Norman, its with Sun for not
providing a stable platform when they had every one's interest and plenty of
time to do it.

I don't blame the Sun accessibility team. They are great and I know they
have always worked very hard. I wonder though if they have ever had the
budget and personnel to really get things done.


Sorry for my ignorance, but could you explain the
> difference between a "Java Application" and use of a
> Java applet from a conceptual view? I thought the
> accessibility issues were the same, both call the JVM,
> both require the developer to design in the
> accessibility calls and information.


The browser adds an extra barrier. (I have had a two year break from Java so
I need to test again) The biggest barrier occurred when tabbing into an
applet. Some browsers let you tab into an applet but none let you tab out of
an applet. If you navigate the web by way of the keyboard you would get
stuck inside the applet.

For applications where the applet is the only item on the web page this is
not an issue because the applet automatically got focus, and if my memory
serves me right, that was across browsers.

Newer browsers and Java versions may have fixed this bug. Macromedia had
this same problem with Flash, but they were able to fixed it.


I haven't seen a succinct list of the current
> technical issues with Firefox. From my perspective at
> a government agency, I would like to share that I
> would hate to not be able to use Firefox as an agency
> standard simply because it doesn't support use with
> the many Java applications we have today. Just my two
> cents.
>
>
Putting my frustrations aside, I agree with you Norman. Currently at Utah
State University, where WebAIM is located, a new Oracle based Java system
that does everything has been installed. It works with IE but not Firefox.
It needs to work in Firefox.


Shane Anderson
WebAIM.org
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Re: Java support in Firefox

Aaron Leventhal
Note that the tabbing issue is the same as the plugins issue we have in
Firefox, and is mentioned on our VPAT. We have that problem with Flash
as well. For PDF and fill page plugns, the browser can be configured to
open the content in a new window, which gets around the problem.

We're looking to fix the problem correctly for Firefox 3, but it will
require changes in the plugins (including the Java plugin). Mats
Palmgren has been hired my Mozilla to address these kinds of focus and
tab navigation issues:
https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=93149

- Aaron

Shane Anderson wrote:

> On 6/27/06, Norman Robinson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> Were you referencing the <OBJECT> tag that was
>> previously required for IE and Windows? That is old
>> and depreciated as far as I know; Java works with the
>> <APPLET> tag. (I.e.,
>>
>> http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/guide/plugin/developer_guide/applet_tag.html 
>>
>> )
>
>
> Actually it is the <applet> tag that was deprecated in HTML 4.01. The
> <object> tag used in a standards compliant form invokes the MSJVM (if
> installed) on IE. If standards compliance is an issue then the
> <applet> tag
> is not an option and the <object> tag does not work properly. At the
> time we
> found that the <applet> tag provided the most consistent results across
> browsers.
>
> Two sample programs that are packaged with the Java
>> Access Bridge: Java Monkey and Java Ferret. These
>> programs attach themselves to any Java programs that
>> run in the same JVM, and use a number of Java Access
>> Bridge features.
>> http://java.sun.com/products/jfc/accessibility/index.jsp
>
>
> Ah yes, Java Monkey and Java Ferret, those are the tools I was
> thinking of.
> Previously they were not bundled and every time I looked for them it
> took me
> 10-15 minutes.
>
> The address accessibility in some of their tutorials:
>> http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/uiswing/misc/access.html
>> http://java.sun.com/developer/JDCTechTips/2005/tt0518.html#1
>>
>> While "some users have had problems" is true (I'm one
>> of them) most of the issues boil down to developers
>> using the built-in MS JVM versus a specific install of
>> Sun's JVM. The Java Access Bridge has greatly
>> improved. And, the access bridge is only for MS
>> Windows - it provides the glue between Java and the MS
>> Accessibility API (MSAA).
>
>
> Right. And since most screen reader users use windows based software, the
> Java Access Bridge is a necessity for the few people who know it
> exists to
> access the perhaps dozen or so accessible applets that exist in the vast
> universe of the internet. :)
>
> Can you sense my frustration? Its not with you Norman, its with Sun
> for not
> providing a stable platform when they had every one's interest and
> plenty of
> time to do it.
>
> I don't blame the Sun accessibility team. They are great and I know they
> have always worked very hard. I wonder though if they have ever had the
> budget and personnel to really get things done.
>
>
> Sorry for my ignorance, but could you explain the
>> difference between a "Java Application" and use of a
>> Java applet from a conceptual view? I thought the
>> accessibility issues were the same, both call the JVM,
>> both require the developer to design in the
>> accessibility calls and information.
>
>
> The browser adds an extra barrier. (I have had a two year break from
> Java so
> I need to test again) The biggest barrier occurred when tabbing into an
> applet. Some browsers let you tab into an applet but none let you tab
> out of
> an applet. If you navigate the web by way of the keyboard you would get
> stuck inside the applet.
>
> For applications where the applet is the only item on the web page
> this is
> not an issue because the applet automatically got focus, and if my memory
> serves me right, that was across browsers.
>
> Newer browsers and Java versions may have fixed this bug. Macromedia had
> this same problem with Flash, but they were able to fixed it.
>
>
> I haven't seen a succinct list of the current
>> technical issues with Firefox. From my perspective at
>> a government agency, I would like to share that I
>> would hate to not be able to use Firefox as an agency
>> standard simply because it doesn't support use with
>> the many Java applications we have today. Just my two
>> cents.
>>
>>
> Putting my frustrations aside, I agree with you Norman. Currently at Utah
> State University, where WebAIM is located, a new Oracle based Java system
> that does everything has been installed. It works with IE but not
> Firefox.
> It needs to work in Firefox.
>
>
> Shane Anderson
> WebAIM.org
> _______________________________________________
> dev-accessibility mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility
>
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Re: Java support in Firefox

Aaron Leventhal-3
In reply to this post by Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism
Back to the original post. It turns out that I should not assume that
Firefox just doesn't make Java accessible. Do you have the Java Access
Bridge installed, you'll need that?

As in IE, if the Java applet opens in a separate window, Java Swing
applets should be accessible.

In Firefox we also expose the MSAA from plugins that support MSAA. I
believe embedded Java applets are treated like a plugin in Firefox.

Has anyone actually tried any of this with the Java Access bridge and
JAWS 7.1 and found that it works any better/worse than in IE?

- Aaron

Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism wrote:

> I do not know if this is off topic for this list. If it is please
> forgive me. I am not sure who to ask. I am finding Firefox's Java
> support to be weak. Internet Explorer seems to work much better with web
> pages that use alot of Java (ie web stock pages) and /or webpages with a
> ".asp" extension. Is this a known problem and can be fixed?
>
> ----
> Angus MacKinnon
> MacKinnon Crest Saying
> Latin -  Audentes Fortuna Juvat
> English - Fortune Assists The Daring
> Web page http://www.infoforce-services.com
> Choroideremia Research Foundation Inc. 2nd Vice president
> http://www.choroideremia.org
>
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Re: Java support in Firefox

Peter Korn-2
Hi Aaron, Angus,

Aaron is correct - using the Java Access Bridge, especially if the
applet is in a separate window, should work as well as any Java
application that uses the Java Accessibility API.  Using the applet
embedded in the web page still has the TAB issue which is being worked on.

Our recommendation for now is that the best way to deploy Java code over
the web is via Java Web Start.  Using this technology you aren't limited
the Applet (or JApplet) base class, but can be a full fledged
application that is simply invoked via a link in a web page.  Java Web
Start is supported on all desktop platforms.  In our CSUN 2005
presentation "Topics in Java Accessibility" we talk about this and other
techniques for delivering accessible Java via the web.  See the slides
(in StarOffice .sxi format) at:
http://www.sun.com/access/articles/csun05-pres/2pm-Java-Accessibility.sxi


Regards,

Peter Korn
Accessibility Architect,
Sun Microsystems, Inc.

> Back to the original post. It turns out that I should not assume that
> Firefox just doesn't make Java accessible. Do you have the Java Access
> Bridge installed, you'll need that?
>
> As in IE, if the Java applet opens in a separate window, Java Swing
> applets should be accessible.
>
> In Firefox we also expose the MSAA from plugins that support MSAA. I
> believe embedded Java applets are treated like a plugin in Firefox.
>
> Has anyone actually tried any of this with the Java Access bridge and
> JAWS 7.1 and found that it works any better/worse than in IE?
>
> - Aaron
>
> Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism wrote:
>> I do not know if this is off topic for this list. If it is please
>> forgive me. I am not sure who to ask. I am finding Firefox's Java
>> support to be weak. Internet Explorer seems to work much better with
>> web pages that use alot of Java (ie web stock pages) and /or webpages
>> with a ".asp" extension. Is this a known problem and can be fixed?
>>
>> ----
>> Angus MacKinnon
>> MacKinnon Crest Saying
>> Latin -  Audentes Fortuna Juvat
>> English - Fortune Assists The Daring
>> Web page http://www.infoforce-services.com
>> Choroideremia Research Foundation Inc. 2nd Vice president
>> http://www.choroideremia.org
>>
> _______________________________________________
> dev-accessibility mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility

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Re: Java support in Firefox

Aaron Leventhal-3
Peter,

Are you aware if anyone has actually tried that with Firefox "just to be
sure" that it works?

- Aaron



Peter Korn wrote:

> Hi Aaron, Angus,
>
> Aaron is correct - using the Java Access Bridge, especially if the
> applet is in a separate window, should work as well as any Java
> application that uses the Java Accessibility API.  Using the applet
> embedded in the web page still has the TAB issue which is being worked
> on.
>
> Our recommendation for now is that the best way to deploy Java code
> over the web is via Java Web Start.  Using this technology you aren't
> limited the Applet (or JApplet) base class, but can be a full fledged
> application that is simply invoked via a link in a web page.  Java Web
> Start is supported on all desktop platforms.  In our CSUN 2005
> presentation "Topics in Java Accessibility" we talk about this and
> other techniques for delivering accessible Java via the web.  See the
> slides (in StarOffice .sxi format) at:
> http://www.sun.com/access/articles/csun05-pres/2pm-Java-Accessibility.sxi
>
>
> Regards,
>
> Peter Korn
> Accessibility Architect,
> Sun Microsystems, Inc.
>
>> Back to the original post. It turns out that I should not assume that
>> Firefox just doesn't make Java accessible. Do you have the Java
>> Access Bridge installed, you'll need that?
>>
>> As in IE, if the Java applet opens in a separate window, Java Swing
>> applets should be accessible.
>>
>> In Firefox we also expose the MSAA from plugins that support MSAA. I
>> believe embedded Java applets are treated like a plugin in Firefox.
>>
>> Has anyone actually tried any of this with the Java Access bridge and
>> JAWS 7.1 and found that it works any better/worse than in IE?
>>
>> - Aaron
>>
>> Visually Insane Genetically Modified Organism wrote:
>>> I do not know if this is off topic for this list. If it is please
>>> forgive me. I am not sure who to ask. I am finding Firefox's Java
>>> support to be weak. Internet Explorer seems to work much better with
>>> web pages that use alot of Java (ie web stock pages) and /or
>>> webpages with a ".asp" extension. Is this a known problem and can be
>>> fixed?
>>>
>>> ----
>>> Angus MacKinnon
>>> MacKinnon Crest Saying
>>> Latin -  Audentes Fortuna Juvat
>>> English - Fortune Assists The Daring
>>> Web page http://www.infoforce-services.com
>>> Choroideremia Research Foundation Inc. 2nd Vice president
>>> http://www.choroideremia.org
>>>
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Re: Java support in Firefox

Aaron Leventhal-3
In reply to this post by Peter Korn-2
Note, I've seen a sample plugin in Firefox that supported MSAA and was
accessible in Window-Eyes. The tabbing issue went away because
Window-Eyes was managing focus. Obviously it would still be a problem
for keyboard users and people with disabilities not using a screen reader.

- Aaron
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