Introductions ...

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Introductions ...

Aaron Leventhal-3
Mozilla accessibility is growing, and a number of new people are getting
involved.

Would people mind providing a quick intro for themselves and what they
are working on or plan to work on?

Here's mine:

I am the architect of Firefox and Mozilla Gecko accessibility for
Windows. I delivered accessibility in Firefox 1.5 running on Microsoft
Windows, including accessibility support for DHTML and XUL applications.
I'm currently part of a team to make Firefox accessible on Linux. I also
also advise the W3C Protocols and Formats committee on emerging
standards for dynamic content accessibility. Prior to joining IBM, I
worked as the accessibility architect for Mozilla development at
Netscape. From 1990 - 2000, I worked at Raised Dot Computing on a
Braille publishing system called MegaDots, which is used by Braille
readers, teachers and publishers.

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David Bolter (was Re: Introductions ...)

David Bolter
I'm not a core mozilla a11y guy. I maintain GOK (the Gnome On-screen
Keyboard) which runs on Linux, Solaris etc. Since GOK has sometimes
doubled as a debugging tool, a lot of my work has included bug triage
including of course, some Mozilla bugs. I'm happy to expand my role on
mozilla a11y as time permits.

[In a nutshell my interest is accessibility under the broadest
definition which IMHO includes the notion of FOSS. Since 1996 I've been
involved in a11y engineering on systems such as Windows, Java, and now,
since 2002, Linux.]

http://david.atrc.utoronto.ca/

cheers,
David


Aaron Leventhal wrote:

> Mozilla accessibility is growing, and a number of new people are
> getting involved.
>
> Would people mind providing a quick intro for themselves and what they
> are working on or plan to work on?
>
> Here's mine:
>
> I am the architect of Firefox and Mozilla Gecko accessibility for
> Windows. I delivered accessibility in Firefox 1.5 running on Microsoft
> Windows, including accessibility support for DHTML and XUL
> applications. I'm currently part of a team to make Firefox accessible
> on Linux. I also also advise the W3C Protocols and Formats committee
> on emerging standards for dynamic content accessibility. Prior to
> joining IBM, I worked as the accessibility architect for Mozilla
> development at Netscape. From 1990 - 2000, I worked at Raised Dot
> Computing on a Braille publishing system called MegaDots, which is
> used by Braille readers, teachers and publishers.
>
> _______________________________________________
> dev-accessibility mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility

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Re: Introductions ...

Charles Chen-2
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
The short version of this introduction is: "Hello, I'm Charles. I'm the
Fire Vox guy, and Fire Vox is an opensource, free screen reader for
Firefox."

The long version is as follows:

I am the creator of the CLC-4-TTS Suite, a cross OS compatible (Windows,
Mac, Linux) collection of JavaScript functions that can be used for
transforming Firefox into a self-voicing browser. The long term goal of
this suite is to provide self-voicing accessibility for all Mozilla
products that use the same extension platform as Firefox, but the
current short term focus is just on the Firefox browser. The most well
known part of this suite is the screen reading application layer which
is called Fire Vox.

Fire Vox has the features that are normally expected in a screen reader
such as the ability to provide meta-information for the content being
read (whether it's a heading, a graphic, a link, etc); lists of
headings, links, images, form elements, access keys, etc.; support for
form elements by reading out keystrokes and the status of whether things
are checked or not; and full keyboard access for all features. It also
has some cutting edge features not commonly found in commercial screen
readers such as native MathML support and CSS3 speech module support.

Fire Vox gets all of its information dynamically straight from the
Firefox DOM. As a result, users are always working on the actual page
and pages with dynamic content can be handled correctly. Fire Vox also
uses the visible navigation caret to determine where a user is. This
behavior, combined with the default option of highlighting the chunk
that is currently being read, makes it easy for sighted users to keep
track of where Fire Vox is on the page.

Fire Vox can be downloaded at: http://www.clcworld.net

A video presentation of it can be found at:
http://firevox.clcworld.net/presentation.avi

A quick start tutorial (still a work in progress) can be found at:
http://firevox.clcworld.net/tutorial.html


I'm currently an undergraduate (soon to be graduate) student at the
University of Texas at Austin. My major is Electrical Engineering with a
focus area of software development.


-Charles L. Chen


> Mozilla accessibility is growing, and a number of new people are getting
> involved.
>
> Would people mind providing a quick intro for themselves and what they
> are working on or plan to work on?
>
> Here's mine:
>
> I am the architect of Firefox and Mozilla Gecko accessibility for
> Windows. I delivered accessibility in Firefox 1.5 running on Microsoft
> Windows, including accessibility support for DHTML and XUL applications.
> I'm currently part of a team to make Firefox accessible on Linux. I also
> also advise the W3C Protocols and Formats committee on emerging
> standards for dynamic content accessibility. Prior to joining IBM, I
> worked as the accessibility architect for Mozilla development at
> Netscape. From 1990 - 2000, I worked at Raised Dot Computing on a
> Braille publishing system called MegaDots, which is used by Braille
> readers, teachers and publishers.
>
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Re: Introductions ...

A Nagappan
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
Hi,
    I'm the architect of Linux Desktop Testing Project (LDTP -
http://ldtp.freedesktop.org). LDTP works based on accessibility
technology. So, the key success of LDTP is only because of the
accessibility layers and libraries. Thanks to IBM and Sun for their
great contributions to the accessibility framework. Me and my team
members are keen in automating Mozilla and other GNOME applications
using LDTP. Currently Novell, Sun China and Palm Source (porting LDTP to
embedded system GUI testing) and OSS enthusiasts are working in this
project. I'm working as a Software Consultant in Novell, Bangalore, India.

Thanks
Nagappan

Aaron Leventhal wrote:

> Mozilla accessibility is growing, and a number of new people are
> getting involved.
>
> Would people mind providing a quick intro for themselves and what they
> are working on or plan to work on?
>
> Here's mine:
>
> I am the architect of Firefox and Mozilla Gecko accessibility for
> Windows. I delivered accessibility in Firefox 1.5 running on Microsoft
> Windows, including accessibility support for DHTML and XUL
> applications. I'm currently part of a team to make Firefox accessible
> on Linux. I also also advise the W3C Protocols and Formats committee
> on emerging standards for dynamic content accessibility. Prior to
> joining IBM, I worked as the accessibility architect for Mozilla
> development at Netscape. From 1990 - 2000, I worked at Raised Dot
> Computing on a Braille publishing system called MegaDots, which is
> used by Braille readers, teachers and publishers.
>
> _______________________________________________
> dev-accessibility mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility

--
Nagappan A <[hidden email]>
Novell Software Development (I) Pvt. Ltd.
Linux Desktop Testing Project - http://ldtp.freedesktop.org
http://nagappanal.blogspot.com/

Novell, Inc.
Software for the Open Enterprise
http://www.novell.com/open 

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Re: Introductions ...

Ginn Chen
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
Hi,

I am the lead of Firefox and Mozilla Gecko accessibility in Sun.
We had delivered Sun Mozilla 1.7 with accessibility supports for  
Solaris 10.
I worked for accessibility theme compliant, keyboard navigation and  
some other stuffs.
I'm also working on AT-tools supports since this year.
Now our team is working together with the community for Firefox 2.0  
and 3.0 accessibility on Solaris.

Our team is based in Beijing, China.

Thanks,

Ginn

On Apr 25, 2006, at 10:25 PM, Aaron Leventhal wrote:

> Mozilla accessibility is growing, and a number of new people are  
> getting involved.
>
> Would people mind providing a quick intro for themselves and what  
> they are working on or plan to work on?
>
> Here's mine:
>
> I am the architect of Firefox and Mozilla Gecko accessibility for  
> Windows. I delivered accessibility in Firefox 1.5 running on  
> Microsoft Windows, including accessibility support for DHTML and  
> XUL applications. I'm currently part of a team to make Firefox  
> accessible on Linux. I also also advise the W3C Protocols and  
> Formats committee on emerging standards for dynamic content  
> accessibility. Prior to joining IBM, I worked as the accessibility  
> architect for Mozilla development at Netscape. From 1990 - 2000, I  
> worked at Raised Dot Computing on a Braille publishing system  
> called MegaDots, which is used by Braille readers, teachers and  
> publishers.
>
> _______________________________________________
> dev-accessibility mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility

--------
Ginn Chen
Software Engineer, Browser Team
Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Phone: +86-10-82618200 (x82869)
Fax:   +86-10-62780969



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Jason White (was Re: Introductions ...)

Jason White
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
Hello,

Responding to Aaron's invitation, I am interested in the accessibility of
Mozilla at a number of levels. First and most importantly, I require braille
and speech-based access to the Web under the Linux operating system. Mozilla
offers the greatest potential to provide a highly effective solution to meet
my needs, especially as the Orca, Gnopernicus, BRLTTY and Mozilla developers
work collaboratively to integrate their respective efforts. While
console-based Web browsers under Linux are very usable, they do not implement
the full range of Web-related languages and standards supported by Mozilla,
notably the DOM and Javascript, essential technologies to client-side user
interfaces these days. Also, Mozilla is the primary focus of development for
technologies designed to make scripted, client-side user interfaces more
accessible. As I am sure the developers of those techniques are on this
mailing list, I won't attempt to offer what would probably be an inaccurate or
out of date summary here. Other opportunities for improved accessibility
are emerging with MathML, SVG and, later, XForms as well as other technologies
being integrated into Mozilla.

I have been active in a number of W3C accessibility-related working groups
over the years and hope to find ways of contributing to the community via this
mailing list.

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RE: Introductions ...

Robinson, Norman B - Washington, DC
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
Greetings!

    I'm the Section 508 Coordinator for the USPS. I participate in this
list as well as several others (W3C, FSG, WebAim, GAWD) to keep informed
as to the state and direction of assistive technologies. I use JAWS
screen reader & IBM's Home Page Reader on Windows and Gnopernicus on
Linux. I use Firefox for inspection and auditing of web based content. I
am most interested in the Windows accessibility, as that is where most
of my organizations computing resides, but am also interested in the
multi-platform aspects as we also maintain one of just about every
mainstream operating system.

    I've tried to add my perspective to keeping our official Section 508
guidance as generic as possible to allow it to make sense on any
platform or application. If interested you can view our official
polices:

        The AS-508 Section 508 Handbook explains the requirements of
Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act and sets forth, in broad outline,
the Postal Service's policies on how to comply with them. All functional
organizations can use the information in this handbook to understand,
achieve, and maintain Section 508 compliance:
       
            AS-508, Section 508 Handbook in HTML:
http://www.usps.com/cpim/ftp/hand/as508/welcome.htm
<http://www.usps.com/cpim/ftp/hand/as508/welcome.htm>  or AS-508,
Section 508 Handbook in PDF Format:
http://www.usps.com/cpim/ftp/hand/as508.pdf
<http://www.usps.com/cpim/ftp/hand/as508.pdf>
       
            and
       
            The AS-508-A Section Technical Reference Guide is a
technical reference guide in support of Handbook AS-508. It breaks out
the details of each of the sections of that handbook and how they are
tied to the law:
       
            AS-508-A, Section 508 Technical Reference Guide in HTML:
http://www.usps.com/cpim/ftp/hand/as508a/welcome.htm
<http://www.usps.com/cpim/ftp/hand/as508a/welcome.htm>  or AS-508-A,
Section 508 Technical Reference Guide in PDF Format:
http://www.usps.com/cpim/ftp/hand/as508a.pdf
<http://www.usps.com/cpim/ftp/hand/as508a.pdf>
       
        Please feel free to review these guidelines and circulate them
as widely as possible. Comments or questions can be directed to
[hidden email]  We welcome constructive criticism and suggested
corrections.

    I'm also interested in accessibility in general, as well as
usability and universal design. If there are any Section 508 related
interpretations I can assist with, I'm happy to help.

    I've been involved in what I call open technologies for sometime, my
first Linux distribution was Slackware, and I run Windows, OS X,
Slackware, Fedora, and CentOS at work and at home. Fedora is my primary
OS of choice. I've tried to contribute as well; I wrote the "Reading Man
Pages" for Linux Command (www.linuxcommand.org).
 
    Regards,
 
 
    Norman B. Robinson


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Re: Jason White (was Re: Introductions ...)

Aaron Leventhal-3
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
Jason White wrote:
> Other opportunities for improved accessibility
> are emerging with MathML, SVG and, later, XForms as well as other technologies
> being integrated into Mozilla.

Some notes on these items:
MathML - Charles Chen's Fire Vox extensions speaks that
XForms - We're having Alexander Surkov look at that
SVG - no work being done but the DHTML accessibility roles and states
will help there. What we really need is to be able to define
relationships, paths and sets within SVG -- I'm thinking of diagrams
here. I would love to see some better research done in this area.

Note that Mozilla Foundation is able to hand out small grants (up to
$10k) to work on accessibility projects. If you know a candidate please
have them contact me. Some project ideas live at
http://www.mozilla.org/access/projects

- Aaron
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Re: Jason White (was Re: Introductions ...)

Charles Chen-2
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3

> SVG - no work being done but the DHTML accessibility roles and states
> will help there. What we really need is to be able to define
> relationships, paths and sets within SVG -- I'm thinking of diagrams
> here. I would love to see some better research done in this area.

I'm interested in looking at adding SVG support to Fire Vox, but are
there any examples of what accessible SVG code is like?

My gut feeling is that the Mozilla examples at
http://www.croczilla.com/svg/samples/ are not accessible since they
don't even bother to use the title attribute...
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Re: Jason White (was Re: Introductions ...)

Jonathan Chetwynd
Charles,

please use http://www.peepo.co.uk, and let me know of your success or  
concerns.
there was an early alpha SVG reader, that read the title contents,  
however this isn't currently available.

regards

Jonathan Chetwynd



On 26 Apr 2006, at 14:00, Charles Chen wrote:


> SVG - no work being done but the DHTML accessibility roles and  
> states will help there. What we really need is to be able to define  
> relationships, paths and sets within SVG -- I'm thinking of  
> diagrams here. I would love to see some better research done in  
> this area.

I'm interested in looking at adding SVG support to Fire Vox, but are  
there any examples of what accessible SVG code is like?

My gut feeling is that the Mozilla examples at http://
www.croczilla.com/svg/samples/ are not accessible since they don't  
even bother to use the title attribute...
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Re: Jason White (was Re: Introductions ...)

Aaron Leventhal-3
In reply to this post by Charles Chen-2
Charles,

We also need to address:
- keyboard nav for those not using your extension.
- get authors to add semantics (more meaningful than title attribute).
See http:/www.mozilla.org/access/dhtml for examples

- Aaron

Charles Chen wrote:

>
>> SVG - no work being done but the DHTML accessibility roles and states
>> will help there. What we really need is to be able to define
>> relationships, paths and sets within SVG -- I'm thinking of diagrams
>> here. I would love to see some better research done in this area.
>
> I'm interested in looking at adding SVG support to Fire Vox, but are
> there any examples of what accessible SVG code is like?
>
> My gut feeling is that the Mozilla examples at
> http://www.croczilla.com/svg/samples/ are not accessible since they
> don't even bother to use the title attribute...
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Re: Introductions ...

Evan Yan
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
Hi,

I am a developer on Firefox accessibility, and a member of Sun China
browser a11y team.
We are working on making Firefox accessible on Solaris.
I'm new to this field, and still getting familiar with the code. :-)

Thanks,

Evan

Aaron Leventhal wrote:

> Mozilla accessibility is growing, and a number of new people are getting
> involved.
>
> Would people mind providing a quick intro for themselves and what they
> are working on or plan to work on?
>
> Here's mine:
>
> I am the architect of Firefox and Mozilla Gecko accessibility for
> Windows. I delivered accessibility in Firefox 1.5 running on Microsoft
> Windows, including accessibility support for DHTML and XUL applications.
> I'm currently part of a team to make Firefox accessible on Linux. I also
> also advise the W3C Protocols and Formats committee on emerging
> standards for dynamic content accessibility. Prior to joining IBM, I
> worked as the accessibility architect for Mozilla development at
> Netscape. From 1990 - 2000, I worked at Raised Dot Computing on a
> Braille publishing system called MegaDots, which is used by Braille
> readers, teachers and publishers.
>
> _______________________________________________
> dev-accessibility mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.mozilla.org/listinfo/dev-accessibility
>  

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Re: Introductions ...

Shane Anderson
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
My name is Shane Anderson. I am the Director of Software Engineering at
WebAIM, a non-profit project at Utah State University's Center for Persons
with Disabilities. WebAIM provides an array of articles, tutorials, and
tools for web accessibility in general but we are expanding our knowledge
base to include XUL. We all love Firefox are looking forward to contributing
by producing articles, tutorials, and tools for the Mozilla accessibility
community.

I have scoped this list out for a couple of years now and I am glad to see
the increase in participation and activity. It is great that Mozilla has
provided a way for the accessibility community to be directly involved in
the development of Firefox. This introduction thread that Aaron started was
a good idea. I am seeing people I know but did not realize were on this
list. This is great.

WebAIM's plans for XUL in the near future are fairly aggressive. In the next
few months we will be writing several articles and tutorials, and we will be
modifying the latest version of WAVE to also evaluate XUL applications for
accessibility. Some of this work will also appear on XULPlanet (Aaron
Andersen, one of our programmers, is a co-founder of XULPlanet).

We look forward to being more involved with Mozilla accessibility.

Thanks,
Shane Anderson
WebAIM.org
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SVG accessibility

Jason White
In reply to this post by Charles Chen-2


On Wed, 26 Apr 2006, Charles Chen wrote:

>
> > SVG - no work being done but the DHTML accessibility roles and states
> > will help there. What we really need is to be able to define
> > relationships, paths and sets within SVG -- I'm thinking of diagrams
> > here. I would love to see some better research done in this area.
>
> I'm interested in looking at adding SVG support to Fire Vox, but are
> there any examples of what accessible SVG code is like?
Have you read http://www.w3.org/TR/svg-access
>
> My gut feeling is that the Mozilla examples at
> http://www.croczilla.com/svg/samples/ are not accessible since they
> don't even bother to use the title attribute...
It might be necessary to develop better examples of SVG designed for
accessibility, concurrently with implementing support for it in Mozilla.

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Re: Introductions ...

eh@mad.scientist.com
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
Hello, everyone.   I'm Eirikur Hallgrimsson, working for Aaron on Linux
Accessibility.  I've got a couple of bugs assigned to me and I'll be
needing help getting up to speed on the C++ codebase and its
conventions/dialects.   I have a lot of experience with Python, so I
may be working on LSR.   I like Ruby a lot but I don't think we'll be
using it :-)

I'm excited about working in this area.   Accessibility is a
requirement for new ways of interacting with computers, and can, in
fact, provide some of the underpinnings for them.  From what I've
learned so far, it appears that robust desktop scripting could emerge
from things like AT-Poke.    I want agents and voice interaction, I saw
2001 (at the premier, in the wild Cinerama surround-screen process) at
an early age and wanted my own HAL.
I was thrilled when I got LSR and Orca speaking.

I've been using Emacs since before GNU (1979).   I've done UI
development for workstations and clusters at DEC/Compaq/HP.  I'm kind
of a UI research and prototyping guy at heart, but I do a lot of
different things including low-level networking.  Most recently I did a
dual touchscreen UI for a combined CAT and PET medical scanner.   There
was a big accessibility piece to that because the touchscreens had to
respond (and give feedback) to operators wearing gloves!   Speech
output would have been a great idea, but even audio feedback was
rejected because of the high noise level from the spinning scanner
ring.

I'm an associate member of the FSF and a big GTK on Linux fan.

My first name is pronounced Eric - er (outside of Iceland--I grew up in
the Boston area).

Eirikur

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Re: Introductions ...

Aaron Leventhal-3
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
I'd love it if we heard from some of the QA guys working on accessibility:

Tim Miao from Sun
Wayne Deangelo from IBM
Dan Kinnunen from IBM
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Fire Vox synthesizer support (was Re: Introductions ...)

Jason White
In reply to this post by Charles Chen-2
On Tue, Apr 25, 2006 at 06:26:45PM -0500, Charles Chen wrote:
> The short version of this introduction is: "Hello, I'm Charles. I'm the Fire
> Vox guy, and Fire Vox is an opensource, free screen reader for Firefox."
I notice that Fire Vox, running under UNIX/Linux, supports FreeTTS (provided
of course that a Java virtual machine is installed).

Are there any plans to support a wider range of synthesizers, for example via
Speech Dispatcher
http://www.freebsoft.org/speechd
or by running Emacspeak speech servers (http://emacspeak.sourceforge.net/)?

In the future, braille support might also be possible via BRLAPI, which is
part of BRLTTY (http://mielke.cc/brltty/).

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Re: Fire Vox synthesizer support (was Re: Introductions ...)

Charles Chen-2
In reply to this post by Charles Chen-2

> Are there any plans to support a wider range of synthesizers, for example via
> Speech Dispatcher
> http://www.freebsoft.org/speechd
> or by running Emacspeak speech servers (http://emacspeak.sourceforge.net/)?
Yes, I do plan to add support for other synthesizers in the future.

I develop on a Win XP machine and test on Linux and Mac, so there's
going to be a bias towards solutions that will run under Win XP. Speech
Dispatcher definitely looks like a neat solution (although I would have
preferred it to have a Java client so that I wouldn't need to compile
separate binaries) so I'll have to look into that some more. Thanks for
bringing that up.



> In the future, braille support might also be possible via BRLAPI, which is
> part of BRLTTY (http://mielke.cc/brltty/).
>

On that note, Doug Williams (who also went with the Mozilla group to
CSUN 2006) is working on a Braille extension for Firefox. So, I'd rather
route my speech stuff through his Braille extension as opposed to trying
to independently duplicate what he is already doing.
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Re: Fire Vox synthesizer support (was Re: Introductions ...)

Jason White
On Thu, Apr 27, 2006 at 08:23:04PM -0500, Charles Chen wrote:
 
> I develop on a Win XP machine and test on Linux and Mac, so there's going to be
> a bias towards solutions that will run under Win XP. Speech Dispatcher
> definitely looks like a neat solution (although I would have preferred it to
> have a Java client so that I wouldn't need to compile separate binaries) so
> I'll have to look into that some more. Thanks for bringing that up.
Many Linux distributions don't include Java by default, for licencing reasons
- at least not Sun's or IBM's implementations. Consequently, it would be
  better from my point of view (and that of other Linux users) if your
  solution could be used without Java installed. This would allow it more
  easily to be integrated into distributions as well.

  Gcj (the gcc compiler for Java) might be another option, if necessary.

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Re: Introductions ...

Ming Gao-2
In reply to this post by Aaron Leventhal-3
Hi,

I am Gao, Ming from IBM China, you can call me Mike. I am working for
Aaron on Firefox accessibility on Linux. I am a newbie on Fx a11y and I
began to fix some bugs and learning the code base these days. The open
source development style is also new to me. It's very joyful to get
things setup and running and get help from irc. My interest is web and
Linux related technologies. The idea of sharing and helping others is
great. So I feel proud to join the team of Fx a11y.

I have been working for IBM on Linux/iSeries system for 3 years and
before that I worked as the developer at Lucent. I began to use Linux
from 1999 and ever developed web applications with Jsp/php/perl/C.

Aaron Leventhal wrote:

> Mozilla accessibility is growing, and a number of new people are getting
> involved.
>
> Would people mind providing a quick intro for themselves and what they
> are working on or plan to work on?
>
> Here's mine:
>
> I am the architect of Firefox and Mozilla Gecko accessibility for
> Windows. I delivered accessibility in Firefox 1.5 running on Microsoft
> Windows, including accessibility support for DHTML and XUL applications.
> I'm currently part of a team to make Firefox accessible on Linux. I also
> also advise the W3C Protocols and Formats committee on emerging
> standards for dynamic content accessibility. Prior to joining IBM, I
> worked as the accessibility architect for Mozilla development at
> Netscape. From 1990 - 2000, I worked at Raised Dot Computing on a
> Braille publishing system called MegaDots, which is used by Braille
> readers, teachers and publishers.
>
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